DigitalNC: New Additions of the Green Line Newspaper Now Available

DigitalNC: New Additions of the Green Line Newspaper Now Available!. “Digital NC is happy to announce the new additions of the Green Line Newspaper, 1987 – 1994. The Green Line newspaper was a local newsletter in Asheville, North Carolina, part of the North Carolina Green Party for the Western NC Green Movement. While many of their initiatives surrounded environmental causes within the community and the state and aligned with the NC Green Party, the newsletter was editorially independent.”

DigitalNC: 1951-1976 Black Mountain News Issues Now Available

DigitalNC: 1951-1976 Black Mountain News Issues Now Available. “Thanks to a nomination by our partner, Swannanoa Valley Museum and History Center, 1,357 issues of Black Mountain News from 1951 to 1976 are now available to view on our website. Black Mountain News is published in Black Mountain which is located in western North Carolina in Buncombe County near Asheville. This batch of Black Mountain News issues builds on our current collection of the paper which originally spanned only from the paper’s first issue on September 6, 1945 to 1950.”

Western Carolina University: WNC Tomorrow Black Oral History Project brings 1980s-era recordings to digital age

Western Carolina University: WNC Tomorrow Black Oral History Project brings 1980s-era recordings to digital age. “Western Carolina University’s Special and Digital Collections at Hunter Library has digitized a collection of interviews conducted between 1986 and 1989 with Black residents from Western North Carolina, all of whom were older than 69 at the time. Recorded as part of the Western North Carolina Tomorrow Black Oral History Project are memories of interactions during segregation, life in the mountains as a Black person and the importance of church and school in the community. Their stories are of days spent sharecropping, service in the military and fighting in world wars, the civil rights movement and integration and other social changes in their lifetimes.”

DigitalNC: New Paper, the Hertford County Herald, Now Available

DigitalNC: New Paper, the Hertford County Herald, Now Available. “The Hertford County Herald, courtesy of Chowan University, is the newest paper available on DigitalNC, with issues up that span the years 1914-1923. The Hertford County Herald was established in 1910, and was published in the town of Ahoskie, North Carolina. The paper, which came out every Friday, was comprised of 8 dense pages to keep residents of Hertford County informed.”

Digital NC: Thirty More Years of the Cherokee Scout Now Online at DigitalNC

Digital NC: Thirty More Years of the Cherokee Scout Now Online at DigitalNC. “Courtesy of our partners, the Murphy Public Library and the Nantahala Regional Library, almost 30 more years of the Cherokee Scout have been newly digitized. That brings our collection to nearly 2500 issues, stretching from 1923-1971! These are brand new to DigitalNC and we are proud to present them. Published weekly, The Cherokee Scout serves Cherokee County, where it remains a staple to its readership of nearly 10,000.”

Digital NC: 70 years of Mars Hill University student newspaper now online

Digital NC: 70 years of Mars Hill University student newspaper now online. “Seventy years of The Hilltop, Mars Hill University’s student newspaper, have been added to DigitalNC. The 924 issues were provided by our partner, Mars Hill University, and cover academic years from 1926-1995. Mars Hill University is located in Mars Hill, a town in Madison County approximately 20 minutes north of Asheville in the mountains of western North Carolina. According to the university’s website, it is ‘the oldest institution of higher learning in western North Carolina on its original site.’”

Morganton News Herald: Local organization highlights historic post office murals

New-to-me: a database of murals in the Blue Ridge Parkway area. “A local organization is sharing its love for an artistic part of history. During America’s Great Depression, more than 5,000 jobs for artists were created by the federal government through the New Deal, according to researchers with the Appalachian Mural Trail, an organization which seeks out and promotes murals in western North Carolina. These artists produced more than 225,000 works of art in post offices throughout the nation.”