Travel Market Report: New Website Tool Helps Tourists Navigate Regions Affected by Wildfires

Travel Market Report: New Website Tool Helps Tourists Navigate Regions Affected by Wildfires. “State tourism organizations in California, Oregon, and Washington have rolled out an enhanced website to provide travelers and advisors with up-to-date information about the ongoing wildfires. [The site] now includes webcams and real-time air-quality information at key destinations and multi-state itineraries to inform travelers who may decide to reroute road trips or seek more planning ideas for trips to the West Coast.”

Fairfield Sun Times: World’s largest collection of Will James’ work at risk without preservation

Fairfield Sun Times: World’s largest collection of Will James’ work at risk without preservation. “James died in 1942. The bulk of his possessions, including drawings, manuscripts, letters, paintings, his saddle, and even a pair of walrus skin saddle bags, were left with his longtime friends Earl and Elanora Snook and later gifted to the Yellowstone Art Museum by their daughter, Virginia Snook. But that generous gift came with a huge catch — the collection must remain in Billings, intact.”

University of Arkansas: Libraries Launch Digital Collection on American Old West

University of Arkansas: Libraries Launch Digital Collection on American Old West. “Whiskey smuggling, murder, scandal and a ‘hanging judge’ — the latest digital exhibit from University Libraries has all this and more. The Deputy Marshal Addison Beck and Judge Isaac Parker’s Court collection is now available worldwide, free of charge. Addison Beck was a deputy marshal for the United States from 1875 to 1883 who patrolled for the United States District Court for the Western District of Arkansas in Fort Smith.”

The Ancestor Hunt: Free U.S. Western States High School and College Yearbooks Online

The Ancestor Hunt: Free U.S. Western States High School and College Yearbooks Online. “Yearbooks from high school or college are one of the most fun set of records for a genealogist to search. It provides you with a ton of story-like information about your ancestor’s life. What their interests were, what sports and clubs they participated in, and often some goofy snapshots of them before they settled into being an adult. And of course, you get to see what they looked like.” Big link list.

Slate: How to Track the Wildfires Raging Across the Western U.S. Online

Slate: How to Track the Wildfires Raging Across the Western U.S. Online. “The Carr fire raging in Shasta County, California has already claimed the lives of six people, with another seven people reported missing. It’s responsible for the destruction of 966 structures, making it the ninth most destructive wildfire in the state’s history according to Cal Fire statistics. While firefighters have gained some ground in Shasta county, according to a Reuters report, there are still more than 60 wildfires that are considered uncontained, mostly concentrated on the western side of the country.”

Washington Post: The disappearing story of the black homesteaders who pioneered the West

Washington Post: The disappearing story of the black homesteaders who pioneered the West. “The physical vestiges of these communities are gradually disappearing. No buildings or markers indicate that black homesteaders once lived at Empire in Wyoming or the Sully County Colored Colony in South Dakota. DeWitty, Blackdom and Dearfield have historical markers, nothing more. A project that I head at the University of Nebraska, working with the Homestead National Monument of America (part of the national park system), is dedicated to creating a digital archive to preserve the memory of the black homesteading movement. But there is an urgent need to save the actual places where so many black people, in the decades after the Civil War, toiled to live and prosper in freedom.”

Colorado Virtual Library: CHNC News! Historic African American Newspapers Now Available

Colorado Virtual Library: CHNC News! Historic African American Newspapers Now Available. “[History Colorado] most recently digitized and added Denver African-American newspapers, the Statesman (1905-1912), and The Denver Star (1912-1918). The Statesman was first published by Joseph D. D. River in 1889. In 1912, The Denver Star began to bill itself as ‘The paper formerly known as the Statesman.’ In 1913, it was noted that ‘the papers formerly known as The Statesman and The Independent, have been merged into The Denver Star.’ While these papers covered news from African-American communities in ‘Colorado, Wyoming, Montana and the West’, they also covered local news from Denver’s Five Points district. Five Points, sometimes referred to as the ‘Harlem of the West’ is one of Denver’s oldest neighborhoods. These newspapers offer researchers a vast amount of information on Denver’s African American culture and community, including its residents, businesses and aspects of everyday life.”