NiemanLab: As of December, publishers will no longer be allowed to send out newsletters on WhatsApp

NiemanLab: As of December, publishers will no longer be allowed to send out newsletters on WhatsApp. “In an effort to crack down on ‘automated or bulk messaging, or non-personal use’ on the platform, WhatsApp will no longer allow publishers to send out newsletters through the app as of December 7, 2019.”

Journalism in the Americas: Use of Instagram and WhatsApp for online news consumption grows in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico: Reuters Institute

Journalism In the Americas: Use of Instagram and WhatsApp for online news consumption grows in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico: Reuters Institute. “In the past year, the use of Instagram and WhatsApp for consuming news online has grown significantly in at least four Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. In Brazil alone, 53 percent of these consumers use WhatsApp for this purpose, the highest among 38 countries.”

Ubergizmo: WhatsApp Warns Of Legal Action Against Abusers Of Its Platform

Ubergizmo: WhatsApp Warns Of Legal Action Against Abusers Of Its Platform. “Facebook-owned WhatsApp is the most popular cross-platform messaging service in the world. Operating at that scale presents its own set of challenges. The company has had to take several steps to ensure that its platform isn’t abused and not used for the spread of misinformation. WhatsApp is now threatening legal action against even those who merely claim that they have the ability to abuse its platform as many companies have emerged who claim to be able to do just that.”

Poynter: What’s Crap on WhatsApp? is the winner of the 2019 Fact Forward Fund

Poynter: What’s Crap on WhatsApp? is the winner of the 2019 Fact Forward Fund. “For the next 12 months, a team led by Africa Check’s Deputy Chief Editor Kate Wilkinson and Volume’s co-founder Paul McNally, will work to expand the success achieved by the pilot of ‘What’s Crap on WhatsApp?.’ Launched May 3, the voice note show was 5 minutes long and dealt with different false stories that were going viral on WhatsApp in South Africa the previous month. One falsity, for example, was an image that showed Zimbabweans burning South African trucks in the border. Using the audio sharing feature, professional fact-checkers were able to debunk it.”

Quartz: WhatsApp is driving Indian women to vote like never before

Quartz: WhatsApp is driving Indian women to vote like never before. “Many women are still missing from the voter rolls — many millions, according to some estimates. This is largely due to lingering disenfranchisement and deliberate voter suppression. It’s possible that a targeted voting advocacy campaign by the Indian Election Commission, better access to education, and general emancipation have helped empower more women to vote. But really it’s the rise of social media and, in particular, WhatsApp.”

Times of India: Over 900 posts taken down from social media platforms during LS polls

Times of India: Over 900 posts taken down from social media platforms during LS polls . “Facebook alone took down 650 posts, followed by Twitter (220), ShareChat (31), YouTube (five) and WhatsApp (three), Director General (Communications) in the EC Dhirendra Ojha said on Sunday, after the seventh and final phase of polling was concluded.”

TechCrunch: WhatsApp exploit let attackers install government-grade spyware on phones

TechCrunch: WhatsApp exploit let attackers install government-grade spyware on phones. “WhatsApp just fixed a vulnerability that allowed malicious actors to remotely install spyware on affected phones, and an unknown number reportedly did so with a commercial-grade snooping package usually sold to nation-states.”