Daily Dot: WikiLeaks website is struggling to stay online—as millions of documents disappear

Daily Dot: WikiLeaks website is struggling to stay online—as millions of documents disappear. “WikiLeaks’ website appears to be coming apart at the seams, with more and more of the organization’s content unavailable without explanation. WikiLeaks technical issues, which have been ongoing for months, have gotten worse in recent weeks as increasingly larger portions of its website no longer function.”

Gizmodo: The U.S. Government Has Amassed Terabytes of Internal WikiLeaks Data

Gizmodo: The U.S. Government Has Amassed Terabytes of Internal WikiLeaks Data. “Late last year, the U.S. government accidentally revealed that a sealed complaint had been filed against Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks. Shortly before this was made public, the FBI reconfirmed its investigation of WikiLeaks was ongoing, and the Wall Street Journal reported that the Department of Justice was optimistic that it would be able to extradite Assange. Soon after, portions of sealed transcripts leaked that implicate WikiLeaks and Assange in directing hackers to target governments and corporations. The charges against Assange have not been officially revealed, though it’s plausible that the offenses are related to Russian hacking and the DNC emails.”

Bleeping Computer: CIA Malware Can Switch Clean Files With Malware When You Download Them via SMB

Bleeping Computer: CIA Malware Can Switch Clean Files With Malware When You Download Them via SMB. “After taking last week off, WikiLeaks came back today and released documentation on another CIA cyberweapon. Codenamed Pandemic, this is a tool that targets computers with shared folders, from where users download files via SMB. The way Pandemic works is quite ingenious and original, and something not seen before in any other malware strain.”

Neowin: CIA-created spyware called Athena released by WikiLeaks, targets all major Windows versions

Neowin: CIA-created spyware called Athena released by WikiLeaks, targets all major Windows versions. “Codenamed ‘Athena’, the spyware was apparently created by the CIA in conjunction with Siege Technologies, a New Hampshire cyber tech firm. Athena allows an attacker to take total control of a computer, send and retrieve data to and from remote locations, such as CIA servers, delete data and also upload other malicious code onto the computer, thereby introducing even more infections. It also works for any version of Windows from Windows XP to Windows 10, marking it as particularly potent in both its capabilities and its reach.”

The Intercept: Leaked NSA Malware Threatens Windows Users Around the World

The Intercept: Leaked NSA Malware Threatens Windows Users Around the World. “The ShadowBrokers, an entity previously confirmed by The Intercept to have leaked authentic malware used by the NSA to attack computers around the world, today released another cache of what appears to be extremely potent (and previously unknown) software capable of breaking into systems running Windows. The software could give nearly anyone with sufficient technical knowledge the ability to wreak havoc on millions of Microsoft users.” Read the update at the end for a few interesting – and eyebrow-raising – bits.

Motherboard: WikiLeaks Won’t Tell Tech Companies How to Patch CIA Zero-Days Until Its Demands Are Met

Motherboard: WikiLeaks Won’t Tell Tech Companies How to Patch CIA Zero-Days Until Its Demands Are Met. “Last week, WikiLeaks promised it would share the technical details and code of the hacking tools that the CIA has allegedly developed against Google, Apple, Microsoft and other tech companies. This week, after days of waiting, the secret-spilling site finally made initial contact with the companies.”

CIA Hacking & Vault 7: Your Guide to the Latest WikiLeaks Release (MakeUseOf)

I haven’t been linking to much about WikiLeaks because honestly, I don’t trust it, and I don’t like the way it treats the privacy of the civilians who end up in its leaks. (Casually.) But if you’ve been seeing news about WikiLeaks and the CIA, and you want a good overview, MakeUseOf has you covered: CIA Hacking & Vault 7: Your Guide to the Latest WikiLeaks Release. “After multiple teasers from WikiLeaks, on 7th March 2017 the whistle-blowing website released a set of documents called Vault 7. These were purportedly leaked from inside the Center for Cyber Intelligence unit of the CIA. To accompany the Vault 7 documents, WikiLeaks prepared a press release detailing the background and main discoveries of the leak. However, in the hours following its release there were a number of sensational headlines that claimed encryption on apps like WhatsApp and Signal had been compromised. This isn’t […]

LA Times: CIA’s apparent hacking techniques revealed in data breach

LA Times: CIA’s apparent hacking techniques revealed in data breach. “The nearly 9,000 documents shared online by the anti-secrecy organization WikiLeaks show the CIA sought to observe targets’ conversations, online browsing and other activities by infiltrating the technology that surrounded them, including Apple and Android smartphones, laptops, TVs and even cars. Operatives worked closely with intelligence agencies at U.S. allies to develop the hacking techniques. And they borrowed ideas from adversaries and the private sector too, refining tools that originated from Russia, criminals and university researchers.”

WikiLeaks Releases Are Causing Collateral Damage

You may have noticed that I don’t link to a lot of WikiLeaks-related stuff. It’s because of this: while I’m a big advocate of transparency in government, I have a serious problem with collateral damage. The AP breaks it down. “In the past year alone, the radical transparency group has published medical files belonging to scores of ordinary citizens while many hundreds more have had sensitive family, financial or identity records posted to the web. In two particularly egregious cases, WikiLeaks named teenage rape victims. In a third case, the site published the name of a Saudi citizen arrested for being gay, an extraordinary move given that homosexuality can lead to social ostracism, a prison sentence or even death in the ultraconservative Muslim kingdom.”

TNW: Facebook admits blocking WikiLeaks’ DNC email links, but won’t say why

TheNextWeb: Facebook admits blocking WikiLeaks’ DNC email links, but won’t say why. This article nails exactly why this is so important: “Facebook can call the issues disparate, but they’re not — not to users. At some point, the ignorance and blind claims of ‘damn that algorithm’ have to end. If Facebook wants us to turn to it for news and treat it seriously, then it has to be much more open.” Or people are going to make up their own reasons and they won’t be complimentary.