TechCrunch: Google and the Internet Archive are the first customers to gain commercial access to Wikipedia content

TechCrunch: Google and the Internet Archive are the first customers to gain commercial access to Wikipedia content. “Google is going to start paying for its use of Wikipedia information to help power its knowledge panels in Google Search. The search giant, along with the digital library the Internet Archive, are the first customers for the still relatively new commercial product launched by the Wikimedia Foundation — the nonprofit that operates Wikipedia. Its new service, Wikimedia Enterprise, offers access to Wikimedia content to companies that reuse and source Wikipedia and other Wikimedia projects at a high volume.”

The Verge: Wikimedia Foundation appeals Russian fine over Ukraine war articles

The Verge: Wikimedia Foundation appeals Russian fine over Ukraine war articles. “The Wikimedia Foundation is challenging a Russian court’s ruling that it violated disinformation laws in articles about the invasion of Ukraine. The organization filed its appeal last week, arguing that the articles contained ‘well-sourced, verified knowledge’ and that Russia did not have jurisdiction over the globally operating Wikimedia Foundation.”

Nature: A cross-verified database of notable people, 3500BC-2018AD

Nature: A cross-verified database of notable people, 3500BC-2018AD. “Our strategy results in a cross-verified database of 2.29 million individuals (an elite of 1/43,000 of human being having ever lived), including a third who are not present in the English edition of Wikipedia. Data collection is driven by specific social science questions on gender, economic growth, urban and cultural development. We document an Anglo-Saxon bias present in the English edition of Wikipedia, and document when it matters and when not.”

CNN: He started the Wikipedia page for the Buffalo shooting and many other tragic events

CNN: He started the Wikipedia page for the Buffalo shooting and many other tragic events. “After Jason Moore, from Portland, Oregon, saw headlines from national news sources on Google News about the Buffalo shooting at a local supermarket on Saturday afternoon, he did a quick search for the incident on Wikipedia. When no results appeared, he drafted a single sentence: ‘On May 14, 2022, 10 people were killed in a mass shooting in Buffalo, New York.’ He hit save and published the entry on Wikipedia in less than a minute.”

Ars Technica: Wikipedia community votes to stop accepting cryptocurrency donations [Updated]

Ars Technica: Wikipedia community votes to stop accepting cryptocurrency donations [Updated]. “More than 200 long-time Wikipedia editors have requested that the Wikimedia Foundation stop accepting cryptocurrency donations. The foundation received crypto donations worth about $130,000 in the most recent fiscal year—less than 0.1 percent of the foundation’s revenue, which topped $150 million last year. Debate on the proposal has raged over the last three months.”

openDemocracy: Belarus is locking up Wikipedia editors over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

openDemocracy: Belarus is locking up Wikipedia editors over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. “Over the past month, the authorities have detained two Wikipedia editors in the country. The reason for their arrest appears to be editing articles about the Russian invasion, as well as editing articles about Lukashenka and Belarusian opposition politicians. Mediazona, a media outlet that focuses on the law and justice system in Belarus, Russia and Central Asia, has reported on the two editors, who made 300,000 edits between them and are now behind bars for their voluntary work.”

New York Times: Want to See the Weirdest of Wikipedia? Look No Further.

New York Times: Want to See the Weirdest of Wikipedia? Look No Further.. “The Instagram account shares bizarre and surprising snippets from the vast, crowdsourced online encyclopedia, including amusing images (a chicken literally crossing a road) and minor moments in history (Mitt Romney driving several hours with his dog atop his car). Some posts are wholesome — such as Hatsuyume, the Japanese word for one’s first dream of the year — while others are not safe for work (say, panda pornography).”

Mashable: The secret Wikipedia prank behind the Pringles mascot’s first name

Mashable: The secret Wikipedia prank behind the Pringles mascot’s first name. “The name ‘Julius Pringles’ — which Kellogg’s claims as officially trademarked, though a search of the United States Patent and Trademark Office site for ‘Julius Pringles’ returned no immediate results — looks not to have come from a marketing team, or some long-forgotten Pringles founder. Rather, the name stems from two Wikipedia savvy, hoax-loving college students snacking away on Sour Cream & Onion Pringles in their dorm room back in 2006.”

Mashable: Russians are downloading Wikipedia en masse as possible ban looms

Mashable: Russians are downloading Wikipedia en masse as possible ban looms . “Reporting for Slate, writer Annie Rauwerda dove into Kiwix’s public stats and found that the number of downloads of the Russian-language Wikipedia have spiked in recent weeks. It’s already been downloaded 148,457 times this month so far. As Rauwerda points out, that’s more than a 4,000 percent uptick in downloads in March when compared to January of this year. Russia’s Federal Service for Supervision of Communications, Information Technology, and Mass Media (abbreviated as Roskomnadzor), aka its censorship agency, threatened to block Wikipedia in the country earlier this month.”