The Verge: This nonprofit plans to send millions of Wikipedia pages to the Moon — printed on tiny metal sheets

The Verge: This nonprofit plans to send millions of Wikipedia pages to the Moon — printed on tiny metal sheets. “A nonprofit with grand ambitions of setting up a library on the Moon is planning to send the entire English archive of Wikipedia to the lunar surface sometime within the next couple of years. Don’t worry: there won’t be reams of Wikipedia printouts sitting in the lunar soil. Instead, the organization says it will send up millions of Wikipedia articles in the form of miniaturized prints, etched into tiny sheets of metal that are thinner than the average human hair. The nonprofit claims that with this method, it can send up millions of pages of text in a package that’s about the size of a CD.”

Wikidata: a platform for your library’s linked open data (Code4Lib)

Code4Lib: Wikidata: a platform for your library’s linked open data. “Seized with the desire to improve the visibility of Canadian music in the world, a ragtag band of librarians led by Stacy Allison-Cassin set out to host Wikipedia edit-a-thons in the style of Art+Feminism, but with a focus on addressing Canadian music instead. Along the way, they recognized that Wikidata offered a low-barrier, high-result method of making that data not only visible but reusable as linked open data, and consequently incorporated Wikidata into their edit-a-thons. This is their story.”

The Verge: Wikipedia has added page previews for easier browsing

The Verge: Wikipedia has added page previews for easier browsing. “Reading through any Wikipedia page can turn into a rabbit hole that can take you to places you never expected. That exploration can be a fun, informative adventure, but it can also be a distraction, especially if the article you click on isn’t actually useful. The new page previews show an image and a couple of sentences that briefly describe the article when you hover your mouse over the link, providing a bit more context for you to decide whether or not you need to click on the link. Clicking on the pop up will take you to the article in question, and if you move the mouse away, it vanishes.”

The Next Web: Wikipedia co-founder’s 8,000-word essay on how to build a better Wikipedia

The Next Web: Wikipedia co-founder’s 8,000-word essay on how to build a better Wikipedia. “I started building online groups on a smaller scale in the mid-1990s, with academic discussion groups. Such groups are actually how Jimmy Wales (the other co-founder of Wikipedia) and I got to know each other. I still very much believe in the ideal of collecting ‘the sum total of human knowledge.’ That is, I think, a very worthwhile mission. But I also believe we can do much better than Wikipedia.”

Haaretz: Breitbart Declares War on Wikipedia as Encyclopedia Gets Drafted Into Facebook’s ‘Fake News’ Battle

Haaretz: Breitbart Declares War on Wikipedia as Encyclopedia Gets Drafted Into Facebook’s ‘Fake News’ Battle. “Breitbart News has declared war on Wikipedia, following Facebook’s introduction of a new feature that uses the free encyclopedia to combat ‘fake news’ being spread on the social media site. The Facebook tool, launched last week, poses arguably the greatest test in years to the volunteer-run online encyclopedia, constituting a massive threat to the internet’s largest and ostensibly most trusted source of free knowledge.”

Medium: What are the ten most cited sources on Wikipedia? Let’s ask the data.

Medium: What are the ten most cited sources on Wikipedia? Let’s ask the data.. “Citations are the foundation of Wikipedia’s reliability: they trace the connection between content added by our community of volunteer contributors and its sources. For readers, citations provide a mechanism to validate and check for themselves that what Wikipedia says is sound and trustworthy: they act as a gateway towards a broader ecosystem of reliable knowledge. In an effort to spearhead more research on where Wikipedia gets its facts from, and to celebrate Open Citations Month, we asked ourselves: what are the most cited sources across all of Wikipedia’s language editions?”

New York Times: If You See Something, Write Something

New York Times: If You See Something, Write Something. “Ryan Ng is a 19-year-old freshman at Baruch College in Manhattan. He studies finance, lives at home with his parents in Queens and is a member of the college’s ‘League of Legends’ video game club. But in the somewhat fanatical world of Wikipedia supercontributors, he is best known by his alias, Epicgenius. As Epicgenius, Mr. Ng has made over 180,000 edits to Wikipedia and created more than 17,000 pages for the site. Most of his work is in the service of his particular fixation: updating the articles associated with all 472 stations of the New York Subway system.”