The Pitch: KCPL’s new Wikipedian in Residence gives us the tools to edit our own stories

The Pitch: KCPL’s new Wikipedian in Residence gives us the tools to edit our own stories. “In June 2021, the Kansas City Public Library announced a new staff position that reimagines the ‘traditional’ librarian role with a digital twist: the Wikipedian in Residence. Miranda Pratt, who graduated from the Kansas City Art Institute in 2019, is filling the post for the inaugural year-long tenure.”

Wired: One Woman’s Mission to Rewrite Nazi History on Wikipedia

Wired: One Woman’s Mission to Rewrite Nazi History on Wikipedia. “[Ksenia] Coffman can’t recall exactly when her concern set in. Maybe it was when she read the article about the SS, the Nazi Party’s paramilitary, which included images that felt to her like glamour shots—action-man officers admiring maps, going on parade, all sorts of ‘very visually disturbing’ stuff. Or maybe it was when she clicked through some of the pages about German tank gunners, flying aces, and medal winners. There were hundreds of them, and the men’s impressive kill counts and youthful derring-do always seemed to exist outside the genocidal Nazi cause. What was going on here? Wikipedia was supposed to be all about consensus. Wasn’t there consensus on, you know, Hitler?”

Slate: How Wikipedia Grew Up With the War on Terror

Slate: How Wikipedia Grew Up With the War on Terror. “On Sept. 4, 2001, the MIT Technology Review published an article titled ‘Free the Encyclopedias!’ introducing Wikipedia, the free web-based encyclopedia. The article described Wikipedia, which had started in January of that year, as ‘intellectual anarchy extruded into encyclopedia form’ and proclaimed that Wikipedia ‘will probably never dethrone Britannica.’ One week after the MIT Technology Review story, the Wikipedia community responded to the spectacular tragedy of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks by kicking into encyclopedia-editing overdrive.”

Business Insider: Pictures of Swastikas temporarily replaced Wikipedia pages for Jennifer Lopez, Ben Affleck

Business Insider: Pictures of Swastikas temporarily replaced Wikipedia pages for Jennifer Lopez, Ben Affleck. “Dozens of Wikipedia pages were temporarily replaced with pictures of Swastikas Monday morning. The changes, which were only in place for a few minutes before the pages reverted to their usual contents, removed all the text and images from the pages and replaced them with a bright red background and large Swastika image, which is also the German Nazi Party’s flag.”

Slate: How to Use Wikipedia When You’re Watching the Olympics

Slate: How to Use Wikipedia When You’re Watching the Olympics. “Even if you don’t visit Wikipedia directly, information from the internet encyclopedia filters out to the broader internet. Googling ‘Simone Biles’ reveals a Google Knowledge panel that is sourced directly from Wikipedia. Likewise, asking Alexa about Biles will prompt the smart speaker to read a summary from her Wikipedia page. In other words, these Big Tech companies are serving up Wikipedia’s free info with the same relentless consistency with which NBC blasts the ‘Olympic Fanfare and Theme’ before commercials.”

Slate: Non-English Editions of Wikipedia Have a Misinformation Problem

Slate: Non-English Editions of Wikipedia Have a Misinformation Problem . “During World War II, Unit 731 of the Japanese military undertook horrific medical experimentation in Manchukuo (Northeast China). Among other things, members of Unit 731 intentionally infected people with the plague as part of an effort to develop bioweapons. The unit’s crimes have been well documented. But if you read the Japanese Wikipedia page on Unit 731 in January, you wouldn’t get the full story. The article said that it is ‘a theory’ that human experiments actually took place. It was just one example of the whitewashing of war crimes on Japanese Wikipedia, as I discovered when I was researching the war.”

Mashable: Wikipedia wants to charge Google, Amazon, and Apple for using its content

Mashable: Wikipedia wants to charge Google, Amazon, and Apple for using its content. “A new report by Wired looks into a brand new division under the Wikimedia umbrella called Wikimedia Enterprise. In a first for the nonprofit Wikimedia Foundation, Wikimedia Enterprise will offer a paid service targeting Wikipedia’s biggest users: Big Tech companies. Wikimedia Enterprise, according to the organization, will provide a commercial product that tailors Wikipedia’s content for publication on services provided by Google, Facebook, Apple, and Amazon — services that millions upon millions of people use every day.”

Boston Public Library: Boston Public Library makes historical images available for use in Wikipedia

Boston Public Library: Boston Public Library makes historical images available for use in Wikipedia. “In celebration of Wikipedia’s 20th anniversary on January 15th, Boston Public Library has uploaded more than 8,000 historical photographs from its archival collections to Wikimedia Commons. These images include some of the library’s most important photographic collections, and contribute to the single largest batch of uploads ever contributed to Wikimedia Commons. By uploading these public domain images, BPL is making them available so that they can be freely used to enhance Wikipedia articles, re-printed in publications, or incorporated in student projects and papers.”

MarketWatch: Wikipedia turns 20 years old today — the free encyclopedia gets more traffic than Netflix

MarketWatch: Wikipedia turns 20 years old today — the free encyclopedia gets more traffic than Netflix. “Wikipedia was launched on Jan. 15, 2001, by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger as an English-language encyclopedia, according to — aptly — Wikipedia. Since then, the website has become every undergrad’s first stop when embarking on a research paper, the go-to site for cheating in trivia, and my personal favorite — The Wiki Game. Wikipedia is the 13th most popular website on the internet, ahead of Netflix NFLX and Reddit. With 55 million articles, the site attracts 1.5 billion unique visitors a month.”

Deutsche Welle: Pakistan threatens Google, Wikipedia over ‘sacrilegious content’

Deutsche Welle: Pakistan threatens Google, Wikipedia over ‘sacrilegious content’. “The Pakistan Telecommunication Authority (PTA) called for the immediate removal of ‘unlawful content’ from Google. The regulators pointed to pages that name religious leader Mirza Masroor Ahmad as the current ‘Khalifa’ or leader of Islam, thus contradicting dominant religious beliefs in the country. They also decried an ‘unauthentic version of Holy Quran’ on Google Play Store.”

MENAFN: UAE- Emirates Literature Foundation partners with Google to put global focus on Arab authors

MENAFN: UAE- Emirates Literature Foundation partners with Google to put global focus on Arab authors. “The Emirates Literature Foundation, together with Google, has launched ‘Kateb Maktub’, an initiative that will vastly increase the presence and visibility of Arab authors online, ahead of World Arabic Language Day. The initiative is designed to boost the number of Arab author pages on Wikipedia, one of the world’s most visited websites with more than 1 billion visitors per month.”

World Health Organization: The World Health Organization and Wikimedia Foundation expand access to trusted information about COVID-19 on Wikipedia

World Health Organization: The World Health Organization and Wikimedia Foundation expand access to trusted information about COVID-19 on Wikipedia. “The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Wikimedia Foundation, the nonprofit that administers Wikipedia, announced today a collaboration to expand the public’s access to the latest and most reliable information about COVID-19. The collaboration will make trusted, public health information available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license at a time when countries face continuing resurgences of COVID-19 and social stability increasingly depends on the public’s shared understanding of the facts.”

Neowin: New wiki project – Abstract Wikipedia – will boost content across languages

Neowin: New wiki project – Abstract Wikipedia – will boost content across languages. “The project was first proposed in a 22-page paper by Denny Vrandečić, founder of Wikidata, earlier this year. He had floated a new idea that would allow contributors to create content using abstract notation which could then be translated to different natural languages, balancing out content more evenly, no matter the language you speak.” My head would absolutely not wrap around this until I saw a page of examples.