Columbia Journalism Review: Wikipedia’s co-founder wanted to let readers edit the news. What went wrong?

Columbia Journalism Review: Wikipedia’s co-founder wanted to let readers edit the news. What went wrong?. “IT’S BEEN ALMOST A YEAR since the launch of WikiTribune, the crowdsourced news site created by Jimmy Wales, co-founder of Wikipedia. If you haven’t heard of WikiTribune, you’re not alone—it hasn’t made a big splash outside hardcore digital-media circles. But it’s an ambitious project, one that was designed to democratize the news as a Wikipedia-style portal where anyone could contribute to and edit news stories.”

Haartez: Israeli Archivists Fume Over Wikimedia Israel’s Reposting of Historical Photos Trove

Haartez: Israeli Archivists Fume Over Wikimedia Israel’s Reposting of Historical Photos Trove. “The Association of Israeli Archivists has roundly condemned Wikimedia Israel, the local affiliate of the U.S. foundation that runs Wikipedia, for copying into its photo archive 28,000 photographs taken in pre-state Israel. In a statement Tuesday, the archivists accused Wikimedia Israel of being ‘thieves in the night’ and said the move may violate intellectual property rights and general ethical norms.”

New York Times: From Encyclopedic Collector to ‘Wikipedian-at-Large’

New York Times: From Encyclopedic Collector to ‘Wikipedian-at-Large’. “In the grand library of the Auckland War Memorial Museum on a Saturday morning in August, a small group of new and slightly nervous Wikipedia editors gathered for a day of training that would arm them to tackle New Zealand’s lackluster representation on the crowdsourced online encyclopedia. Leading the so-called Wikiblitz was New Zealand’s official Wikipedian-at-Large, Mike Dickison, 49, who has in some senses been preparing his entire life for this post. “

MIT News: Why some Wikipedia disputes go unresolved

MIT News: Why some Wikipedia disputes go unresolved . “Often, multiple Wikipedia editors will disagree on certain changes to articles or policies. One of the main ways to officially resolve such disputes is the Requests for Comment (RfC) process. Quarreling editors will publicize their deliberation on a forum, where other Wikipedia editors will chime in and a neutral editor will make a final decision. Ideally, this should solve all issues. But a novel study by MIT researchers finds debilitating factors — such as excessive bickering and poorly worded arguments — have led to about one-third of RfCs going unresolved.”

Motherboard: Wikipedia Bans Right Wing Site Breitbart as a Source for Facts

Motherboard: Wikipedia Bans Right Wing Site Breitbart as a Source for Facts. “Wikipedia editors voted to ban Breitbart as a source of fact in it articles. The consensus, reached late last month, agreed that the outlet ‘should not be used, ever, as a reference for facts, due to its unreliability.’ Wikipedia editors also decided that InfoWars is a ‘conspiracy theorist and fake news website,’ and that the ‘use of InfoWars as a reference should be generally prohibited.'”

Internet Archive: More than 9 million broken links on Wikipedia are now rescued

Internet Archive: More than 9 million broken links on Wikipedia are now rescued. “As part of the Internet Archive’s aim to build a better Web, we have been working to make the Web more reliable — and are pleased to announce that 9 million formerly broken links on Wikipedia now work because they go to archived versions in the Wayback Machine.”

TechCrunch: Amazon donates $1M to Wikimedia

TechCrunch: Amazon donates $1M to Wikimedia . “Back in March, we asked the question ‘Are corporations that use Wikipedia giving back?’ The answer was kind of, sort of, with one key exception, noting, ‘Apple, Facebook, Microsoft and Google all contributed around $50,000 by matching employee gifts. Amazon, on the other hand, is nowhere to be found on that list.’ Today, however, the online retail giant is looking to address that apparent oversight, announcing a $1 million donation to the Wikimedia Endowment, the fund behind Wikipedia.”