Twitter Blog: Using data from the conversation on Twitter to help detect wildfires

Twitter Blog: Using data from the conversation on Twitter to help detect wildfires. “This wildfire season, Mayday.ai is set to combine data from the unfolding conversation on Twitter with its proprietary incident detection system, which is based on satellite sensors, an array of 35,000 traffic cameras, and IP911 to power a comprehensive detection and a highly targeted notification tracker. Mayday.ai has developed a comprehensive dispatch platform and a mobile app which will provide first responders and civilians unprecedented access to real-time incident information — and has so far had much success in detecting wildfires using its proprietary platform and is being used as a template for other disasters in Mayday’s roadmap.”

Utah State University: The Utah Fire Atlas Offers Land Managers a New Tool

Utah State University: The Utah Fire Atlas Offers Land Managers a New Tool. “Using the fire atlas, researchers will characterize both wildfires and prescribed fires in Utah so the data can inform land management and policy decisions that will create greater resilience to wildfires and optimize post-fire conditions. The institute is concentrating on fires from 100 to 1000 acres – a size relevant to managers considering prescribed or ‘let burn’ fires.”

Phys .org: Mapping dry wildfire fuels with AI and new satellite data

Phys .org: Mapping dry wildfire fuels with AI and new satellite data. “Anticipating where a fire is likely to ignite and how it might spread requires information about how much burnable plant material exists on the landscape and its dryness. Yet this information is surprisingly difficult to gather at the scale and speed necessary to aid wildfire management. Now, a team of experts in hydrology, remote sensing and environmental engineering have developed a deep-learning model that maps fuel moisture levels in fine detail across 12 western states, from Colorado, Montana, Texas and Wyoming to the Pacific Coast.”

Phys .org: COVID-19 could reduce wildfire risk this season, says expert

Phys .org: COVID-19 could reduce wildfire risk this season, says expert. “COVID-19 may cause a drop in spring wildfires as people are still being asked to self-isolate throughout May, Alberta’s riskiest fire month, says a University of Alberta expert. ‘Since we’re still staying at home in May, there are fewer people recreating or working in the forests and human-caused fires will be reduced,’ said wildfire scientist Mike Flannigan. ‘Over 80 percent of Alberta’s wildfires in May are started by humans.'”

US Forest Service: USDA Forest Service Releases Community Wildfire Risk Website

Released last month but I missed it. From the US Forest Service: USDA Forest Service Releases Community Wildfire Risk Website. “For the first time, community wildfire risk has been mapped nationwide to help community leaders mitigate risk. The USDA Forest Service today announced the free, interactive, easy-to-use website, Wildfire Risk to Communities. This website is designed to help community leaders nationwide understand how wildfire risk varies across a state, region, or county and allow them to prioritize actions to protect their communities.”

Phys .org: Coronavirus forces new approaches to fighting wildfires

Phys .org: Coronavirus forces new approaches to fighting wildfires. “They are two disasters that require opposite responses: To save lives and reduce the spread of COVID-19, people are being told to remain isolated. But in a wildfire, thousands of firefighters must work in close quarters for weeks at a time. Wildfires have already broken out in Texas and Florida, and agencies are scrambling to finish plans for a new approach. They are considering waivers for some training requirements to previously-certified crew members, and moving some training online.”

9News Australia: World-first 3D map shows smoke plumes from Australian bushfires as captured from space

9News Australia: World-first 3D map shows smoke plumes from Australian bushfires as captured from space. “In a world-first, an interactive map depicting the height of smoke plumes from bushfires during the peak of Australia’s bushfire crisis has been released. It is hoped that the new tool will improve the Bureau of Meteorology’s ability to predict where potentially dangerous smoke haze will move, as well as provide crucial ‘big picture’ information to disaster management agencies.”

9 News Australia: New map shows impact of fires on fruit and nut farms

9 News Australia: New map shows impact of fires on fruit and nut farms. “A new map shows how fires have impacted some of Australia’s fruit and nut industry. Scientists have released the map, which shows avocado, mango, olive, banana, macadamia and citrus orchards that have been hit by the bushfire crisis, and those which have been spared.”

The West Australian: Google Maps gets overseas tourists stuck near Goldfields fire zone

The West Australian: Google Maps gets overseas tourists stuck near Goldfields fire zone. “Drivers are being warned not to trust online maps in times of emergencies after two tourists were found down a backtrack near Norseman as firefighters tackled several blazes. Kalgoorlie incident control centre public information officer Drew Griffiths said emergency services had located a foreign couple who appeared to have relied on information from an online maps service to go around the road closures.”

Junkee: Here Are A Bunch Of Good Causes And Businesses That Are Helping Out With The Bushfires

Junkee: Here Are A Bunch Of Good Causes And Businesses That Are Helping Out With The Bushfires. “As bushfires continue to rage across much of NSW, Victoria and South Australia, it’s easy to feel helpless. And while the government is flailing about trying to catch up with the crisis, there are a bunch of businesses, charities, and good causes that are doing their bit to help out.”

The Conversation: How to monitor the bushfires raging across Australia

The Conversation: How to monitor the bushfires raging across Australia. “The following short guide draws on my experience covering bushfires as a reporter and my academic research. It may not be exhaustive but is intended to help Australians and their overseas family and friends source useful information and monitor the movement of fire fronts in real time.”

University of Washington: Better wildfire and smoke predictions with new vegetation database

University of Washington: Better wildfire and smoke predictions with new vegetation database. “Researchers from the University of Washington and Michigan Technological University have created the first comprehensive database of all the wildfire fuels that have been measured across North America. Called the North American Wildland Fuel Database, the tool incorporates the best available measurements of vegetation in specific locations, and allows fire managers to see where information about fuels is missing altogether.”

Nature: A global wildfire dataset for the analysis of fire regimes and fire behaviour

Nature: A global wildfire dataset for the analysis of fire regimes and fire behaviour. “Here, we present and test a data mining work flow to create a global database of single fires that allows for the characterization of fire types and fire regimes worldwide. This work describes the data produced by a data mining process using MODIS burnt area product Collection 6 (MCD64A1). The entire product has been computed until the present and is available under the umbrella of the Global Wildfire Information System (GWIS).”

PR Newswire: New website officialfireclaims. com and 888-909-0100 phone number opened to help NorCal wildfire victims file loss claims to PG&E Bankruptcy Court (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: New website officialfireclaims.com and 888-909-0100 phone number opened to help NorCal wildfire victims file loss claims to PG&E Bankruptcy Court (PRESS RELEASE). “This extension and information outlets (website, phone number and service centers) are important to anyone who has not already filed a claim with the PG&E bankruptcy court, including, but not limited to: property owners, renters, occupants, businesses and others. Filing a claim is free and can be filed for any reason, but typical claims include damages to or loss of a home, personal property and more. Renters may file claims as well as homeowners. Non-residents may also file a claim. Persons or entities can also file claims for losses or damages that were not covered by their insurance.”

Travel Market Report: New Website Tool Helps Tourists Navigate Regions Affected by Wildfires

Travel Market Report: New Website Tool Helps Tourists Navigate Regions Affected by Wildfires. “State tourism organizations in California, Oregon, and Washington have rolled out an enhanced website to provide travelers and advisors with up-to-date information about the ongoing wildfires. [The site] now includes webcams and real-time air-quality information at key destinations and multi-state itineraries to inform travelers who may decide to reroute road trips or seek more planning ideas for trips to the West Coast.”