EurekAlert: Putting a conservation finger on the internet’s pulse

EurekAlert: Putting a conservation finger on the internet’s pulse. “Scientists from the University of Helsinki have figured out how to mine people’s online reactions to endangered animals and plants, so that they can reduce the chance of pushing species toward extinction.”

Mongabay: Holding social media companies accountable for facilitating illegal wildlife trade (commentary)

Mongabay: Holding social media companies accountable for facilitating illegal wildlife trade (commentary). “Facebook, and other social media firms, mainly rely on algorithms and artificial intelligence to moderate harmful content. But investigations by the Alliance to Counter Crime Online (ACCO) show time and again how these algorithms actually connect traffickers faster than moderators can remove them. They suggest friends and recommend groups, putting illicit actors in touch with one another, continually expanding networks of users engaging in similar illegal activities.”

Newswise: Museums Put Ancient DNA to Work for Wildlife

Newswise: Museums Put Ancient DNA to Work for Wildlife. “Scientists who are trying to save species at the brink of extinction are finding help in an unexpected place. Heather Farrington, curator of zoology for the Cincinnati Museum Center, is using DNA from specimens collected more than 100 years ago to help understand the evolution and stresses faced by today’s animals.”

Phys .org: Online prototype could improve ocean migratory species governance

Phys .org: Online prototype could improve ocean migratory species governance. “An online mapping and knowledge platform prototype could soon offer free and easily accessible information on the migratory patterns of endangered species in the ocean. The Migratory Connectivity in the Ocean (MiCO) system has been launched by The University of Queensland’s Dr. Daniel Dunn.”

Cornell: CVM scientists develop online tool to guide wildlife repopulation efforts

Cornell: CVM scientists develop online tool to guide wildlife repopulation efforts. “Wildlife ecologists often turn to reintroduction programs to help sustain key species in certain habitats. While the wild turkey effort was a success, other long-term reintroduction programs struggle to see their species thrive. To help address this problem, a multidisciplinary team with the Cornell Wildlife Health Lab has created StaPOPd, an interactive online tool that tells users exactly how many plants or animals they need to introduce into a habitat in order to establish a stable population.”

Earth: New AI software can recognize and track chimpanzees in the wild

Earth: New AI software can recognize and track chimpanzees in the wild. “Using more than 10 million images from Kyoto University’s Primate Research Institute (PRI), scientists at the University of Oxford have just developed new artificial intelligence software that can recognize and track the faces of chimpanzees in the wild.”

Joplin Globe: Area students partner with Smithsonian for nationwide research project

Joplin Globe: Area students partner with Smithsonian for nationwide research project. “The project, called Snapshot USA, is a partnership between the museum and one university from each of the 50 states with students capturing photographs and collecting research for a national wildlife database. The goal is to analyze nationwide trends in mammal communities, as well as the influence of human beings on nature.”