Phys .org: AI computer vision breakthrough IDs poachers in less than half a second

Phys .org: AI computer vision breakthrough IDs poachers in less than half a second. “Thousands of animals including elephants, tigers, rhinos, and gorillas are poached each year. Researchers at the USC Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society have long been applying AI to protect wildlife. Initially, computer scientists were using AI and game theory to anticipate the poachers’ haunts, and now they have applied artificial intelligence and deep learning to spot poachers in near real-time.”

UC Santa Barbara: Where’s the Bear?

UC Santa Barbara: Where’s the Bear?. “Consider Sedgwick Ranch Reserve, part of UC Santa Barbara’s Natural Reserve System. A sprawling and pristine 6,000 acres and nine square miles, the protected land used for research and teaching is a veritable nirvana for animals of all kinds. Mountain lions and black bears and deer, oh my. And they are all represented many times over in the reserve’s massive image archive — millions of pictures of thousands of animals, captured by multiple camera traps and dating back more than a decade. But who has time to sort them all? Cue the computer scientists.”

Facebook top choice for Philippines wildlife traders: monitor (The Independent)

The Independent: Facebook top choice for Philippines wildlife traders: monitor. “Facebook has emerged as the top site for wildlife trafficking in the Philippines, a watchdog said Friday, with thousands of endangered crocodiles, snakes and turtles illegally traded in just three months. Monitoring network TRAFFIC said Facebook had not done enough to shut down the trade, which saw more than 5,000 reptiles from 115 species put up for sale on its discussion groups from June to August 2016 alone.”

The Guardian: Rhinoceros DNA database successful in aiding poaching prosecutions

The Guardian: Rhinoceros DNA database successful in aiding poaching prosecutions. “A large database of rhinoceros DNA is successfully being used to prosecute poachers and those trading rhino horns, new research has revealed. While numbers of the southern white rhino – the only wild subspecies of white rhino in Africa – have grown to about 20,000, fewer than 5,500 black rhinos are thought to exist in the wild, and both species are affected by poaching.”

Hindustan Times: India starts work on Rhino DNA database to curb poaching

Hindustan Times: India starts work on Rhino DNA database to curb poaching. “India is creating a DNA database to hold genetic information of its rhino population in a bid to curb poaching of the endangered species whose horns are in great demand in the illegal wildlife trade.”

Motherboard: How to Scrub GPS Data from Your Photos

Motherboard: How to Scrub GPS Data from Your Photos. “So you want to help protect wildlife and scrub the GPS data that might be embedded in your photos? Great! First, know that when you upload an image to a majority of popular social media sites (i.e., Facebook, Twitter, Instagram), the EXIF data (where location info can hide) is automatically deleted. ‘But Asia,’ you say, ‘Who knows if they’re actually deleting the data. I have to nuke the EXIF myself. It’s the only way to be sure.’ You’ve convinced me with that Aliens reference. Here’s a brief, non-comprehensive walkthrough to make sure your images are squeaky clean.”

Enid News: Interactive Oklahoma map showcases 13-year fish collection data

Enid News: Interactive Oklahoma map showcases 13-year fish collection data. “Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) launched an interactive map depicting details of the organization’s fish monitoring data of about 400 stream monitoring sites statewide from 2003 to 2016. ‘The OWRB’s water monitoring activities provide a very detailed and comprehensive statewide analysis of fish species populations among several other parameters that we are monitoring. This particular map viewer contains layers that display all fish species collected for more research-minded users. It also provides layers that display sports fish numbers and types for use by anglers,’ said Bill Cauthron, chief of OWRB’s Water Quality Division.”