Neowin: Here’s what’s new for Windows 8.1 and 7 this Patch Tuesday

Neowin: Here’s what’s new for Windows 8.1 and 7 this Patch Tuesday. “We’re already three months deep into 2021, and as we reach the second Tuesday of March, that means it’s time once again for Microsoft to update every supported version of Windows. Naturally, the most recent versions of Windows 10 are getting updates, but Windows 8.1 is also still supported. And, for businesses paying for extended security updates, so is Windows 7.”

BetaNews: Windows 10 has a dangerous print spooler bug, and there is no fix

BetaNews: Windows 10 has a dangerous print spooler bug, and there is no fix. “An unpatched vulnerability in the Windows Print Spooler exists that could be exploited by an attacker to run malicious software with elevated system privileges. The issue affects Windows 7, Windows 8.x, Windows 10 as well as versions of Windows Server. It is being tracked as CVE-2020-1048 and CVE-2020-1337 and has a severity rating of ‘Important’.”

Neowin: Here’s what’s new in this month’s Patch Tuesday for Windows 7 and 8.1

Neowin: Here’s what’s new in this month’s Patch Tuesday for Windows 7 and 8.1. “It’s that time of the month again when every supported version of Windows gets an update with a bunch of fixes. This week, in addition to cumulative updates, we saw the release of the Windows 10 November 2019 Update. Windows 7 and 8.1 haven’t been forgotten just yet, and there’s a couple of updates for these older versions of the OS, too.”

Neowin: Microsoft’s Chromium-based Edge browser now available for Windows 7, 8, and 8.1

Neowin: Microsoft’s Chromium-based Edge browser now available for Windows 7, 8, and 8.1. “Microsoft first started offering public previews of its new Chromium-based Edge browser over two months ago. At the time, it was for AMD64 Windows 10 PCs only, but since then, it’s expanded to x86 Windows 10 PCs, and to macOS. Today though, the firm announced that you can now test out the browser on older versions of Windows, including Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 8.1.”

Patch Tuesday: Here’s what’s new for Windows 7 and 8.1 (Neowin)

Neowin: Patch Tuesday: Here’s what’s new for Windows 7 and 8.1. “Today is Patch Tuesday, the second Tuesday of the month when Microsoft releases updates for all supported versions of Windows. While that means that all but one version of Windows 10 got cumulative updates, older versions like Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 get updates as well. If you’re still on Windows 7 SP1 or Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, you’ll get KB4503292 as this month’s rollup.”

Neowin: Windows 8 will no longer get app updates after this summer

Neowin: Windows 8 will no longer get app updates after this summer. “Last year, Microsoft announced when it would be killing app updates and distribution in the Windows Store for Windows Phone 8.x and Windows 8.x. At the time, the blog post stated that Windows Phone 8.x devices would stop receiving app updates after July 1, 2019, while Windows 8.x devices would get app updates through July 1, 2023. However, it seems as though plans have changed a little bit, as the blog post has quietly been updated earlier this month.”

Patch Tuesday: Here’s what’s new for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 (Neowin)

Neowin: Patch Tuesday: Here’s what’s new for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1. “It’s the second Tuesday of the month, and that means it’s time for Patch Tuesday updates. As usual, today’s cumulative updates are heading out to all supported versions of Windows. These include Windows 10 and all older versions of Windows that are still supported. That list includes Windows 7 and its corresponding server version, Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, Windows 8.1 and Server 2012 R2, and the original Windows Server 2012.”

Patch Tuesday: Here’s what’s new for Windows 7 and 8.1 (Neowin)

Neowin: Patch Tuesday: Here’s what’s new for Windows 7 and 8.1. “Today is Patch Tuesday, the second Tuesday of the month when Microsoft releases updates for all supported versions of Windows. Alongside Windows 10, older versions like Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 get updates as well and that includes their corresponding Windows Server versions. This month is a pretty easy one, as all of the updates have the same changelog.”

The Register: Microsoft silently fixes security holes in Windows 10 – dumps Win 7, 8 out in the cold

The Register: Microsoft silently fixes security holes in Windows 10 – dumps Win 7, 8 out in the cold. “Microsoft is silently patching security bugs in Windows 10, and not immediately rolling out the same updates to Windows 7 and 8, potentially leaving hundreds of millions of computers at risk of attack. Flaws and other programming blunders that are exploitable by hackers and malware are being quietly cleaned up and fixed in the big Windows 10 releases – such as the Anniversary Update and the Creator’s Update. But this vital repair work is only slowly, if at all, filtering back down to Windows 7 and Windows 8 in the form of monthly software updates.”

BetaNews: NTFS bug allows any website to crash Windows 7, 8.1

This looks more annoying than anything else, but: from BetaNews: NTFS bug allows any website to crash Windows 7, 8.1. “Users of older versions of Windows aren’t having the best time of it lately. Last week it was discovered that over 98 percent of those affected by the WannaCry ransomware were running Windows 7, and now a new bug has been found which can slow down and crash systems running that OS and Windows 8.1. The new bug is trivially easy to exploit, making just browsing the web potentially hazardous, and there’s currently no fix available.”

Krebs on Security: Microsoft Issues WanaCrypt Patch for Windows 8, XP

Putting this up top in case you’re in a situation where you have to use Windows XP: Microsoft Issues WanaCrypt Patch for Windows 8, XP. “Microsoft Corp. today took the unusual step of issuing security updates to address flaws in older, unsupported versions of Windows — including Windows XP and Windows 8. The move is a bid to slow the spread of the WanaCrypt ransomware strain that infected tens of thousands of Windows computers virtually overnight this week.”

Bleeping Computer: User-Made Patch Lets Owners of Next-Gen CPUs Install Updates on Windows 7 & 8.1

Bleeping Computer: User-Made Patch Lets Owners of Next-Gen CPUs Install Updates on Windows 7 & 8.1. “GitHub user Zeffy has created a patch that removes a limitation that Microsoft imposed on users of 7th generation processors, a limit that prevents users from receiving Windows updates if they still use Windows 7 and 8.1.” The patch is open-sourced so you can review it, but you still want to do a full backup before you try using it. Patches that try to rectify artificial blocks by an operating system have a big uphill battle.

MakeUseOf: How to Create a Portable Windows To Go USB Drive

MakeUseOf: How to Create a Portable Windows To Go USB Drive. “Windows To Go is a version of Windows 8.1 Enterprise designed to run on a portable device such as a USB flash drive or external drive. You can install applications, and work with files stored on the drive, but you’ll have to sync any apps you may have purchased from the Windows Store manually.” I tried to set up something like this around 2007, but never managed it.

Rolling Back From a Windows 10 Update

I really hope you have not gotten caught in the horrible Windows 10 upgrade trap, but in case you did, here’s how to roll back. “After pushing out the free upgrade as a Recommended update to Windows 7 and 8 users earlier this year—which means that you downloaded the initial installation bits if you use the default Windows Update, like most people should—Microsoft changed its nagging pop-up prompt in an insidious way over the past week. For the past six months, the “Get Windows 10” pop-up asked permission to start an update, but lacked a ‘No thanks’ option, so the only way to avoid it was to close the window by pressing the X in the upper-right hand corner. Now, the pop-up says ‘We will upgrade you at this time,’ and pressing the X counts as consent. You need to click a small, easily missed link in the pop-up to […]