BBC: Cambridge University anti-women students ‘confetti and rockets’ digitised

BBC: Cambridge University anti-women students ‘confetti and rockets’ digitised. “Confetti and fireworks, collected at an 1897 street protest opposing women’s rights to get university degrees, are to be digitised for public record. They date from a demonstration in Cambridge held by male students opposed to student equality.”

Phys .org: Women in Fisheries website launched

Phys .org: Women in Fisheries website launched. “New research exploring women’s roles in fishing families officially gets going this week, as the Women in Fisheries project launches its new website. The study is examining how women contribute to the survival of both fishing families and the fishing industry, and will shed light on women’s roles, identities and wellbeing. Collecting data on both sides of the Atlantic—in Newfoundland, Canada and here in the UK—Women in Fisheries is also hoping to understand how small-scale fishing families (those using boats under 10m in length) are adapting to a changing environmental and economic climate.”

British Library: Building collections on Gender Equality at the UK Web Archive

British Library: Building collections on Gender Equality at the UK Web Archive. “2018 is the centenary of the 1918 Representation of the People’s Act. UK-wide memorials and celebrations of this journey, and victory of women’s suffrage, are all evident online: from events, exhibitions, commemorations and campaigns. Popular topics being discussed at the moment include the hashtags #timesup and #metoo, gender pay disparity and the recent referendum on the 8th Amendment in the Republic of Ireland. These discussions produce a lot of ephemeral material, and without web archiving this material is at risk of moving or even disappearing. Web Archives are able to demonstrate that gender equality is increasingly being discussed in the media and these discussions have been developing over many years.”

b2o: Michelle Moravec — The Endless Night of Wikipedia’s Notable Woman Problem

b2o: Michelle Moravec — The Endless Night of Wikipedia’s Notable Woman Problem. “The challenge, if we wish to write women back into history via Wikipedia, is to figure out how to shift the frame of reference so that our stars can shine, since the problem of who precisely is ‘worthy of commemoration’ so often seems to exclude women. This essay takes on one of the ‘tests’ used to determine whether content is worthy of inclusion in Wikipedia, notability, to explore how the purportedly neutral concept works against efforts to create entries about female historical figures.”

Global Voices: Social media users are trying to combat harassment in Pakistan — but will state institutions do their part?

Global Voices: Social media users are trying to combat harassment in Pakistan — but will state institutions do their part?. “In most countries around the world, gender-based harassment is an old problem. But in the digital era, with hashtag movements such as #MeToo, and social media platforms where evidence of harassment can go viral, the balance of power between harassers and their targets appears to be shifting.”

The Guardian: Academic writes 270 Wikipedia pages in a year to get female scientists noticed

The Guardian: Academic writes 270 Wikipedia pages in a year to get female scientists noticed. “Jess Wade is a scientist on a mission. She wants every woman who has achieved something impressive in science to get the prominence and recognition they deserve – starting with a Wikipedia entry. ‘I’ve done about 270 in the past year,’ says Wade, a postdoctoral researcher in the field of plastic electronics at Imperial College London’s Blackett Laboratory. ‘I had a target for doing one a day, but sometimes I get too excited and do three.'”

NPR: Doctoral Student Compiles Database Of Indigenous Women Who’ve Gone Missing

NPR: Doctoral Student Compiles Database Of Indigenous Women Who’ve Gone Missing. “As many as 300 indigenous women go missing or are killed under suspicious circumstances every year in Canada and the U.S., but the exact number is unknown because the Federal Bureau of Investigation isn’t really tracking the numbers. ‘I would venture a guess that if we did have the data, it would show that native women are more disproportionately represented,’ Annita Lucchesi says…. Lucchesi is a doctoral student at the University of Lethbridge in Canada now. Back when she was working on her master’s thesis, she tried to find the total number of indigenous women who were either killed or went missing in U.S. and Canada.”