Stanford Medicine: New database expected to strengthen prematurity research

Stanford Medicine: New database expected to strengthen prematurity research. “A new online tool will make it easier for researchers to share many types of data from scientific studies of premature birth. The recently launched March of Dimes Database for Preterm Birth Research brings together information collected at five prematurity research centers funded by the March of Dimes, including Stanford’s.”

Hooray for Hollywood? New tool reveals gender bias in movie scripts (University of Washington-Seattle)

University of Washington-Seattle: Hooray for Hollywood? New tool reveals gender bias in movie scripts. “If, as Oscar Wilde once said, “Life imitates art far more than art imitates life,” then the art of film has a lot to answer for when it comes to the perpetuation of gender stereotypes. Thanks to researchers in the Allen School’s Natural Language Processing research group, we now have a way to measure the sometimes subtle biases in how men and women are portrayed on the big screen — and increase our understanding of how language shapes our perception of gender roles…. [Yejin] Choi and her colleagues created an online database that enables researchers and members of the public to explore their findings for hundreds of popular films.”

EurekAlert: Social media accounts promote skeletal images of women

EurekAlert: Social media accounts promote skeletal images of women. “Skeletal images of bodies featuring protruding bones and pencil-thin limbs are being shared and promoted on social media, new research shows. A study by the University of Exeter shows how Twitter and Instagram accounts are celebrating extreme thinness, with users invited to say they ‘like’ images.”

BBC: YouTube lifts Swazi bare-breasted dancer restrictions

BBC: YouTube lifts Swazi bare-breasted dancer restrictions. “A spokesperson for the video-sharing platform told the BBC that YouTube allows nudity when ‘culturally relevant or properly contextualised’. Users who had uploaded reed dance videos were angered when it was classified as age-restricted content. YouTube has denied accusations of racism, saying it was keen to be culturally sensitive.

LA Times: #WomenBoycottTwitter to show support for those harassed on the social media platform

LA Times: #WomenBoycottTwitter to show support for those harassed on the social media platform. “Twitter Inc. gave the world the hashtag. Now the social media company is witnessing the power of the pound sign firsthand. A 24-hour boycott of Twitter by women Friday served as a protest against the silencing of women’s voices and a show of support for women who have been harassed on the social media platform, organizers and prominent participants said.”

New York Times: In Her Own Words, Photographing the Vietnam War

New York Times: In Her Own Words, Photographing the Vietnam War. “Ms. [Catherine] Leroy wrote over 100 letters home during her three years in Vietnam, one almost every 10 days, and they show how she was processing her experiences and navigating professional challenges. They are candid and revealing, attesting to her resiliency, exposing insecurities, and showing her in moments of triumph, despair, optimism or courage….Now a selection of those letters are featured on a new website, accompanied by some of her archive and details from her life.”

Quartz: With a series of Wikipedia Edit-a-Thons, Indian women are finally getting their due online

Quartz: With a series of Wikipedia Edit-a-Thons, Indian women are finally getting their due online. “You only have to look at the Wikipedia page of the early 20th century Indian painter Amrita Sher-Gil to know that she’s a household name: It’s detailed, well-sourced, and full of pictures of her works, some of which have been sold for millions of dollars. But there’s a whole world of contemporary woman artists that hasn’t been half as lucky when it comes to Wikipedia, lacking even a page on the go-to online encyclopedia, let alone a comprehensive one. And it’s this glaring discrepancy that a small group of students and young professionals came together to fix on Sept. 16, as part of a Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon dedicated to Indian women in contemporary art.”