Blavity: There Is Now A Database Documenting The Stories Of More Than 160 Black Women Radicals Thanks To This Howard University Student

Blavity: There Is Now A Database Documenting The Stories Of More Than 160 Black Women Radicals Thanks To This Howard University Student. “With a desire to bring Black women and nonbinary activists out of the heavy depths of forgotten history, [Jaimee] Swift founded Black Women Radicals, an organization that shines a light on past and present leadership across the African diaspora. After over a year of dedicated research, Swift did a soft launch in October.”

The Project Comedy Club Database

Another one of those things I stumbled across thanks to the Bing News RSS feed: The Project Comedy Club database. From the About page: “Project CCDB came to fruition when a few comedians in a text feed were complaining about the lack of women/POC diversity in nationwide comedy club line-ups, even in large markets like Los Angeles, where the population contains more than enough qualified (audience-drawing) comics for booking. After months of exchanging photos of predominantly white male lineups, these comics got sick of complaining about it and connected with an interested computer scientist to gather actual data from clubs over a three month period and see if the hearsay was true or just rumors of a resentful messaging group. So, here are the facts as they stand of what genders and ethnicitites are most represented.”

Duke University Digitizes Women’s Handbooks

I found out yesterday on Twitter that Duke digitized its collection of women’s handbooks. From the about page: “The Social Standards Committee, part of the Woman’s Student Government Association, was responsible for developing standards of behavior for all students attending Duke’s Woman’s College (1930-1972). These handbooks, issued each year to each student, provided guidelines on dress, etiquette, and comportment for Woman’s College students both on and off campus.” Learn about that inhuman monster Sloppy Jo, who goes downtown in anklets.. and without a hat! Also, I learned that pin curlers in public are a social faux pas that can completely destroy your life. Or something.

IFL Science: This Is Why Women Are Setting Their Gender To Male On Instagram

IFL Science: This Is Why Women Are Setting Their Gender To Male On Instagram. “The Instagram community guidelines state that nudity and inappropriate content is not allowed on the platform. ‘This includes photos, videos, and some digitally-created content that show sexual intercourse, genitals, and close-ups of fully-nude buttocks. It also includes some photos of female nipples, but photos of post-mastectomy scarring and women actively breastfeeding are allowed.’ However back in April, the Instagram algorithm changed to demote certain posts, even if they don’t technically break the rules set by the platform itself, HuffPost reports. “

State of Delaware: Interactive Site Commemorates Women’s Suffrage Centennial

State of Delaware: Interactive Site Commemorates Women’s Suffrage Centennial. “The website… includes interactive quizzes for kids and adults, reading lists for people of all ages, and lesson plans for teachers and students of all ages. The Women’s Suffrage Centennial Committee created a website that includes a historical summary about the general Women’s Suffrage Movement as well as Delaware’s part in the effort. The site will include perspectives from people of all walks of life, making sure Delaware residents get a complete understanding of the Women’s Suffrage Movement.”

Google Blog: Finalists from our Design Challenge are Changing the Game

Google Blog: Finalists from our Design Challenge are Changing the Game. “Research shows that while half of all mobile game players are women, only 23 percent of them think there’s equal treatment and opportunity in the industry. In order to promote women as players and creators, Change The Game empowers the next generation of game makers so all players can feel represented and engaged. Our annual Design Challenge encouraged teenagers nationwide to design an original game. We received over 1,500 entries and selected five finalists, who worked with Girls Make Games. These winning games are now available for download on Google Play.”