Boing Boing: YouTube removes criticism of dangerous fractal wood burning instructions, but leaves up the lethal tips

Boing Boing: YouTube removes criticism of dangerous fractal wood burning instructions, but leaves up the lethal tips. “It is extraordinarily dangerous, and dozens of people have been killed following instructions contained in viral videos. Ann Reardon recently posted a thorough debunking of the method, which quickly became popular in its own right… But YouTube has removed Reardon’s video, claiming it is harmful and dangerous—while leaving up fractal wood burning videos demonstrating methods that have killed, at latest count, 34 people in America.”

Spotted on Reddit: Makerbook

Spotted on Reddit: Makerbook. It’s a specialty search engine for finding woodworking, metal fabrication, or blacksmithing shops in your area that will let you rent the use of their space. The advanced search is decent, allowing you to filter by tool or experience level, but I don’t see any kind of About page or changelog as more information is added to the site.

Woodworking Network: Appalachian Partnership launches new Ohio Wood Products website

Woodworking Network: Appalachian Partnership launches new Ohio Wood Products website. “Transforming standing timber into these products and services requires a diverse group of talent, transportation, and technology. The Supply Chain Database on the site has more than 1,600 companies and 300 sawmills represented, and steadily growing. The directory’s GIS-enabled map pinpoints and connects hardwood suppliers, master loggers, craftsmen, and products.”

LumberJocks Forum: New Database of Woodworking Machines

From the LumberJocks forum: New Database of Woodworking Machines. ” own a few vintage Inca machines that I really enjoy for their precision and craftsmanship. As I started acquiring and repairing more machines, I kept running into the problem that it can be quite difficult to find information about these machines. Often you will have to spend a lot of time browsing different forums to find that bit of information you were looking for. That’s why I came up with the idea to create a simple database of woodworking machines (mostly vintage ones initially), where information is centralized.” There are about a hundred machines here currently, with a focus on European machines.

EurekAlert: Reprocessing cultural heritage

EurekAlert: Reprocessing cultural heritage . “‘Although historical film recordings and documentaries exist, these often do not do justice to the scientific demands of a comprehensive documentation of the craft’, explained Rosa von Suess, UAS Lecturer and Head of the project at St. Pölten UAS. ‘The goal of our project is to combine traditional woodworking with new innovative forms of conveyance and presentation thus making this old knowledge usable for future generations’, said Michael Grabner, project Head from the Institute of Wood Technology and Renewable Materials of the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna.”

The Wilson Post: Antique Southern furniture sleuth

New-to-me, from The Wilson Post: Antique Southern furniture sleuth. “The Southern furniture historian said the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts is ‘the largest collection of Southern-made material culture in the world and is concentrated on the American South and includes furniture, paintings, metal works, textiles, pottery and some architecture.’…The museum was established in 1965, and its entire collection may be viewed online.”

Apollo Magazine: How a digital dictionary will advance furniture history

Apollo Magazine: How a digital dictionary will advance furniture history. “Previously, when you typed ‘Chippendale’ into an art-historical database, you would have received basic information, which may or may not have been entirely correct. Now there is a new resource, British and Irish Furniture Makers Online (BIFMO), just launched and available to all online, which will not only tell you about Thomas Chippendale, but which will give you access to all his connections in the furniture trade, to his patrons, to the influence he had on furniture design, and to his materials and workshop practice.”