CNET: What is cheugy? And how do you know if you’re a cheug?

CNET: What is cheugy? And how do you know if you’re a cheug?. “You might have noticed the word ‘cheugy’ popping up online and wondered what it means and how to pronounce it. New slang is a surefire way to make you question your fleeting youth. In this case, that couldn’t be more true. In short, cheugy is a trendy way to say something is passe, and the word’s having a moment on TikTok, where folks are busy labeling what’s cheugy, having existential crises over being cheugy or just embracing life as a cheug.” Oh, so, like, someone who listens to disco and says “groovy” all the time?… oh. >cough

PR Newswire: Dictionary. com Announces New Words Relating to Covid, Social Justice, and More (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Dictionary.com Announces New Words Relating to Covid, Social Justice, and More (PRESS RELEASE). “Dictionary.com today announced its latest addition of new words, which reflects the ongoing impact of COVID-19 on language and hits on a variety of additional themes relating to race, social justice, identity, and culture. The leading online dictionary has updated 7,600 entries, including 450 new entries and 94 new definitions in existing entries.”

Wired: AI and the List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words

Wired: AI and the List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words. “COMEDIAN GEORGE CARLIN had a list of Seven Words You Can’t Say on TV. Parts of the internet have a list of 402 banned words, plus one emoji, 🖕. Slack uses the open source List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words, found on GitHub, to help groom its search suggestions. Open source mapping project OpenStreetMap uses it to sanitize map edits. Google artificial intelligence researchers recently removed web pages containing any of the words from a dataset used to train a powerful new system for making sense of language.”

Tor: Look Up That SF Term in the New Online Historical Dictionary of Science Fiction

Tor: Look Up That SF Term in the New Online Historical Dictionary of Science Fiction. “The crowd-sourced project comes from Jesse Sheidlower, a former editor-at-large from the Oxford English Dictionary—it originated as an OED initiative, and is now a standalone site. The dictionary is designed to not only put definitions to the genre’s terminology, but to show how those words have been used over time.”

The Guardian: Oxford Dictionaries: 2020 has too many Words of the Year to name just one

The Guardian: Oxford Dictionaries: 2020 has too many Words of the Year to name just one. “For the first time, the Oxford English Dictionary has chosen not to name a word of the year, describing 2020 as ‘a year which cannot be neatly accommodated in one single word’. Instead, from ‘unmute’ to ‘mail-in’, and from ‘coronavirus’ to ‘lockdown’, the eminent reference work has announced its ‘words of an “unprecedented” year’.”

CBR: James Gunn, Merriam-Webster Come to a Consensus on How to Spell ‘Asshat’

CBR: James Gunn, Merriam-Webster Come to a Consensus on How to Spell ‘Asshat’. “Writer/director James Gunn recently reached out to the internet for help with a project he’s currently writing. While he wouldn’t name the script he needed it for, Gunn asked his followers on Twitter how they prefer to spell the word ‘asshat’. He claimed that the poll settled the matter forever — and the Merriam-Webster dictionary backed him up.”

Scientific American: Explore 175 Years of Words in Scientific American

Scientific American: Explore 175 Years of Words in Scientific American. “We invite you to dive in and explore a database of words that appeared prominently in the print history of Scientific American. Below, each year of that history is represented by a single word, which was selected through a text-analysis project that started with all 5,107 issues of the magazine. Words whose relative frequency peaked in each individual year were identified.”

Screen Rant: How To Find Made Up Words With Meaningless Definitions

Screen Rant: How To Find Made Up Words With Meaningless Definitions . “If you don’t know what Tendercake means then it is a cake or filling typically made with the flattened piece of fruit and cake eaten dry, according to an AI web tool that’s specifically designed to make up words. The website where the AI is located doesn’t only make up words, but also provides context through meaningless definitions and examples that makes them sound authentic. This is the just the latest example of how artificial intelligence is being used for new and novel purposes.”

Science Codex: Exploring the use of ‘stretchable’ words in social media

Science Codex: Exploring the use of ‘stretchable’ words in social media. “An investigation of Twitter messages reveals new insights and tools for studying how people use stretched words, such as ‘duuuuude,’ ‘heyyyyy,’ or ‘noooooooo.’ Tyler Gray and colleagues at the University of Vermont in Burlington present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 27, 2020.”