Mashable: ‘Scrabble’ is getting 300 new words this fall

Mashable: ‘Scrabble’ is getting 300 new words this fall. “It’s time to throw away your outdated dictionary and dust off those tiles, baby, because Scrabble is getting some new words. The folks behind Scrabble are beefing up the official Scrabble player’s dictionary with 300 new words to keep up with the times and give veteran players some fresh verbs and nouns to memorize.”

The Next Web: Dictionary. com now explains slang like basic b*tch, cuck, and f*ckboy to normies

The Next Web, and I apologize for censoring the heck out of this headline: Dictionary.com now explains slang like basic b*tch, cuck, and f*ckboy to normies. “Buckle up for the news of the century fam: Dictionary.com is upping its street cred with a bunch of new, funky-fresh slang definitions… This means you no longer have to sit around like a chump when the cool kids start dropping modern terminology at parties, nam sayin’. Instead, you can whip out your phone and and consult Dictonary.com for some turnt words you can use to show you’re truly part of the gang.” My favorite recently-learned slang is caping. It just means to defend someone/something, often mindlessly.

Merriam-Webster: The Dictionary Just Got a Whole Lot Bigger

Merriam-Webster: The Dictionary Just Got a Whole Lot Bigger. “The language doesn’t take a vacation, and neither does the dictionary. The words we use are constantly changing in big ways and small, and we’re here to record those changes. Each word has taken its own path in its own time to become part of our language—to be used frequently enough by some in order to be placed in a reference for all. If you’re likely to encounter a word in the wild, whether in the news, a restaurant menu, a tech update, or a Twitter meme, that word belongs in the dictionary. A big batch of new words and new definitions for existing words has just been added to our dictionary at Merriam-Webster.com: 850 terms that come from a cross-section of our linguistic culture.”

Phys .org: Using Twitter to discover how language changes

Phys .org: Using Twitter to discover how language changes. “Scientists at Royal Holloway, University of London, have studied more than 200 million Twitter messages to try and unravel the mystery of how language evolves and spreads. The aim of the research was to consider if the spread of language is similar to how genes pass from person-to-person. The team investigated whether language transmission, when people have a conversation, happens in a similar way to when genes are transmitted from a parent to a child.”

The Guardian: OED’s new words include ‘mansplaining’ but steer clear of ‘poomageddon’

The Guardian: OED’s new words include ‘mansplaining’ but steer clear of ‘poomageddon’. “From ‘poonami’ to ‘shitastrophy’, the venerable editors of the Oxford English Dictionary found themselves deluged with words relating to the explosive contents of nappies when they turned to parenting forum Mumsnet to ask which words and phrases should be considered for inclusion in their latest update.”

Search Engine Journal: 28 Free Tools to Help You Find What People Search For

Search Engine Journal: 28 Free Tools to Help You Find What People Search For . “Getting into the groove of keyword research doesn’t just happen overnight. You need to know how people search and what they search for before you can even start to think about mapping your keywords. And with more than 6 billion searches a day worldwide, how do you know where to start It’s about finding the deepest, darkest, secret corners of the user’s search intent to find ‘the right stuff’ in a bowl full of ‘meh’s.'” Now obviously I couldn’t care less about using these tools for SEO. But I always want to learn more about how other people craft their search language, because it can give me ideas.