ScienceDaily: Analysis of billions of Twitter words reveals how American English develops

ScienceDaily: Analysis of billions of Twitter words reveals how American English develops . “Linguists and geographers analysed 8.9 billion words contained within 980 million Tweets posted across the United States between 2013 and 2014 to identify the regions from which new words tend to originate. Led by Professor Jack Grieve, from the Centre for Corpus Research at the University of Birmingham, researchers used advanced computer technology to analyse the geocoded Tweets which revealed the precise longitude and latitude of the user at the time of posting.”

Quartz: The Oxford English Dictionary is opening its gates to teenage slang—via Twitter

Quartz: The Oxford English Dictionary is opening its gates to teenage slang—via Twitter. “As a historical dictionary, the OED is interested in the meaning of words and also the changes in usage over time. To help produce its comprehensive record, OED has launched an appeal to teenagers to tweet or write in about the latest words that they’ve been using.”

KTXS: Merriam-Webster adds 840 words to dictionary including hangry, GOAT, guac

KTXS: Merriam-Webster adds 840 words to dictionary including hangry, GOAT, guac. “Next time someone tries to tell you ‘hangry’ isn’t a word during a game of Scrabble… tell them to check the dictionary. Merriam Webster added 840 new words and definitions to the ever-evolving English vocabulary.”

The Conversation: The math behind Trump’s tweets

The Conversation: The math behind Trump’s tweets. “Given the volume of Trump’s tweets and their potential political relevance, we thought it would be revealing and novel to use mathematical methods to analyze the web of interactions formed by his most frequently used keywords.”

Ars Technica: Dictionaries of the future define “Yass,” embrace memes, and think of robots

Ars Technica: Dictionaries of the future define “Yass,” embrace memes, and think of robots. “Despite the ever-connected nature of life today, there remains a moment that all of us eventually encounter. Whether talking to a friend, texting with a family member, or emailing and chatting with coworkers, a word pops up that simply stymies. Wait, what does that mean? Rather than racing to the bookshelf and grabbing the old-reliable, these days most people simply type into their search engine of choice and brace for the results—typically with Dictionary.com near the top of the list.”

Mashable: ‘Scrabble’ is getting 300 new words this fall

Mashable: ‘Scrabble’ is getting 300 new words this fall. “It’s time to throw away your outdated dictionary and dust off those tiles, baby, because Scrabble is getting some new words. The folks behind Scrabble are beefing up the official Scrabble player’s dictionary with 300 new words to keep up with the times and give veteran players some fresh verbs and nouns to memorize.”

The Next Web: Dictionary. com now explains slang like basic b*tch, cuck, and f*ckboy to normies

The Next Web, and I apologize for censoring the heck out of this headline: Dictionary.com now explains slang like basic b*tch, cuck, and f*ckboy to normies. “Buckle up for the news of the century fam: Dictionary.com is upping its street cred with a bunch of new, funky-fresh slang definitions… This means you no longer have to sit around like a chump when the cool kids start dropping modern terminology at parties, nam sayin’. Instead, you can whip out your phone and and consult Dictonary.com for some turnt words you can use to show you’re truly part of the gang.” My favorite recently-learned slang is caping. It just means to defend someone/something, often mindlessly.