Scientific Data: Lexibank, a public repository of standardized wordlists with computed phonological and lexical features

Scientific Data: Lexibank, a public repository of standardized wordlists with computed phonological and lexical features . “Inspired by the GenBank database, where scholars can deposit nucleotide sequences publicly, we have created Lexibank, a collection of cross-linguistic datasets in standardized formats, which offers access to word forms, sound inventories, and lexical features for more than 2000 language varieties derived from 100 individual high-quality datasets. The Lexibank wordlist collection is a first attempt to integrate the wealth of language data assembled during the past centuries.”

Mashable: Amanda Gorman kicks off new ‘Word of the Day’ series with ‘Sesame Street’ muppets

Mashable: Amanda Gorman kicks off new ‘Word of the Day’ series with ‘Sesame Street’ muppets. “On Monday, poet Amanda Gorman taught Sesame Street’s Grover about a new word, ‘upstander.’ Gorman is the first guest in a new “Word of the Day” video series from Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit behind Sesame Street. Produced in partnership with media company WarnerMedia Kids and Family, the series ‘harnesses the power of language to nurture children’s positive and healthy senses of self,’ according the announcement.”

Google Blog: “New normal” and other words we used a lot this year

Google Blog: “New normal” and other words we used a lot this year. “As a writer, something I’ve been thinking about in the last few weeks of 2021 are the words we used this year. 2020 was the year of ‘now more than ever,’ a phrase that began to feel meaningless as the ‘now more than ever’-worthy moments kept coming (and admittedly, as we all kept calling them that). If 2020 was the year of “now more than ever,” then what was 2021?”

PR Newswire: Dictionary.com Announces “Allyship” as its 2021 Word of the Year (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Dictionary.com Announces “Allyship” as its 2021 Word of the Year (PRESS RELEASE). “Dictionary.com, the leading online and mobile English-language educational resource, today announced its Word of the Year: allyship. The word carries special distinction this year as it marks the first time Dictionary.com has chosen a word new to its dictionary as its Word of the Year.”

Mass Live: Merriam-Webster names ‘vaccine’ as Word of the Year for 2021; ‘Insurrection,’ ‘woke’ and ‘cicada’ follows as top lookups

Mass Live: Merriam-Webster names ‘vaccine’ as Word of the Year for 2021; ‘Insurrection,’ ‘woke’ and ‘cicada’ follows as top lookups. “Merriam-Webster has named “vaccine” as its Word of the Year for 2021, a tribute to scientific advancements that aimed to end the COVID-19 pandemic and the heated arguments over inoculation mandates that the shots brought on.”

Cornell Chronicle: Words used in text-mining research carry bias, study finds

Cornell Chronicle: Words used in text-mining research carry bias, study finds. “The word lists packaged and shared amongst researchers to measure for bias in online texts often carry words, or ‘seeds,’ with baked-in biases and stereotypes, which could skew their findings, new Cornell research finds. For instance, the presence of the seed term ‘mom’ in a text analysis exploring gender in domestic work would skew results female.”

Google Blog: Learn a new word every day

Google Blog: Learn a new word every day. “Now, through the Google app on your phone, you can sign up to receive daily notifications that help you learn new words and some of the interesting facts behind them. For example, did you know the word ‘benefactor’ comes from the Latin saying ‘bene facere,’ which means ‘do good?’”

New York Times: How Word Lists Help — or Hurt — Crossword Puzzles

New York Times: How Word Lists Help — or Hurt — Crossword Puzzles. “If we were to go by the New York Times Crossword, Lake ERIE would be the most dazzling body of water on Earth. Mining ORE would be the most lucrative business venture. According to xwordinfo.com, ERIE is the third most popular word in the New York Times Crossword. It has appeared over 1,350 times. ORE is seventh, with over 1,200 appearances. ORE and ERIE are examples of crosswordese, words that appear often in crossword puzzles but rarely in day-to-day conversation.”