Google Blog: “New normal” and other words we used a lot this year

Google Blog: “New normal” and other words we used a lot this year. “As a writer, something I’ve been thinking about in the last few weeks of 2021 are the words we used this year. 2020 was the year of ‘now more than ever,’ a phrase that began to feel meaningless as the ‘now more than ever’-worthy moments kept coming (and admittedly, as we all kept calling them that). If 2020 was the year of “now more than ever,” then what was 2021?”

PR Newswire: Dictionary.com Announces “Allyship” as its 2021 Word of the Year (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Dictionary.com Announces “Allyship” as its 2021 Word of the Year (PRESS RELEASE). “Dictionary.com, the leading online and mobile English-language educational resource, today announced its Word of the Year: allyship. The word carries special distinction this year as it marks the first time Dictionary.com has chosen a word new to its dictionary as its Word of the Year.”

Mass Live: Merriam-Webster names ‘vaccine’ as Word of the Year for 2021; ‘Insurrection,’ ‘woke’ and ‘cicada’ follows as top lookups

Mass Live: Merriam-Webster names ‘vaccine’ as Word of the Year for 2021; ‘Insurrection,’ ‘woke’ and ‘cicada’ follows as top lookups. “Merriam-Webster has named “vaccine” as its Word of the Year for 2021, a tribute to scientific advancements that aimed to end the COVID-19 pandemic and the heated arguments over inoculation mandates that the shots brought on.”

Cornell Chronicle: Words used in text-mining research carry bias, study finds

Cornell Chronicle: Words used in text-mining research carry bias, study finds. “The word lists packaged and shared amongst researchers to measure for bias in online texts often carry words, or ‘seeds,’ with baked-in biases and stereotypes, which could skew their findings, new Cornell research finds. For instance, the presence of the seed term ‘mom’ in a text analysis exploring gender in domestic work would skew results female.”

Google Blog: Learn a new word every day

Google Blog: Learn a new word every day. “Now, through the Google app on your phone, you can sign up to receive daily notifications that help you learn new words and some of the interesting facts behind them. For example, did you know the word ‘benefactor’ comes from the Latin saying ‘bene facere,’ which means ‘do good?’”

New York Times: How Word Lists Help — or Hurt — Crossword Puzzles

New York Times: How Word Lists Help — or Hurt — Crossword Puzzles. “If we were to go by the New York Times Crossword, Lake ERIE would be the most dazzling body of water on Earth. Mining ORE would be the most lucrative business venture. According to xwordinfo.com, ERIE is the third most popular word in the New York Times Crossword. It has appeared over 1,350 times. ORE is seventh, with over 1,200 appearances. ORE and ERIE are examples of crosswordese, words that appear often in crossword puzzles but rarely in day-to-day conversation.”

There’s an official $#@&ing terminology for censoring swears like $#@&: Grawlix (Boing Boing)

Boing Boing: There’s an official $#@&ing terminology for censoring swears like $#@&: Grawlix. “this tweet was the first time I have ever seen a “$&%#@!” word referred to as ‘Grawlix.’ It’s one of those weird linguistic things that I’ve always just accepted, and taken for granted, without considering that someone would have named, identified, and categorized it. According to a 2013 article from Slate, the term ‘grawlix’ was coined by Beetle Bailey creator Mort Walker.”

CNET: What is cheugy? And how do you know if you’re a cheug?

CNET: What is cheugy? And how do you know if you’re a cheug?. “You might have noticed the word ‘cheugy’ popping up online and wondered what it means and how to pronounce it. New slang is a surefire way to make you question your fleeting youth. In this case, that couldn’t be more true. In short, cheugy is a trendy way to say something is passe, and the word’s having a moment on TikTok, where folks are busy labeling what’s cheugy, having existential crises over being cheugy or just embracing life as a cheug.” Oh, so, like, someone who listens to disco and says “groovy” all the time?… oh. >cough

PR Newswire: Dictionary. com Announces New Words Relating to Covid, Social Justice, and More (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Dictionary.com Announces New Words Relating to Covid, Social Justice, and More (PRESS RELEASE). “Dictionary.com today announced its latest addition of new words, which reflects the ongoing impact of COVID-19 on language and hits on a variety of additional themes relating to race, social justice, identity, and culture. The leading online dictionary has updated 7,600 entries, including 450 new entries and 94 new definitions in existing entries.”

Wired: AI and the List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words

Wired: AI and the List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words. “COMEDIAN GEORGE CARLIN had a list of Seven Words You Can’t Say on TV. Parts of the internet have a list of 402 banned words, plus one emoji, 🖕. Slack uses the open source List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words, found on GitHub, to help groom its search suggestions. Open source mapping project OpenStreetMap uses it to sanitize map edits. Google artificial intelligence researchers recently removed web pages containing any of the words from a dataset used to train a powerful new system for making sense of language.”