Columbia News: Is Your Data Safe?

Columbia News: Is Your Data Safe?. “As technological and legal changes have hollowed out the protections that reporters and news organizations have depended upon for decades, information security concerns facing journalists as they report, produce, and disseminate the news have only intensified. From source prosecutions to physical attacks and online harassment, the last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the risks faced by journalists at all levels, even as the media industry confronts drastic cutbacks in budgets and staff. As a result, few professional or aspiring journalists have a comprehensive understanding of what is required to keep their sources, stories, colleagues, and reputations safe.”

Washington Post: Covid cases and deaths grossly underestimated among meatpackers, House investigation finds

Washington Post: Covid cases and deaths grossly underestimated among meatpackers, House investigation finds. “More workers at the country’s top five meatpacking companies were sickened and died of the coronavirus than had been previously estimated, an investigation by the House select subcommittee on the coronavirus crisis has found. At least 59,000 workers at Tyson Foods, Smithfield Foods, JBS, Cargill and National Beef — companies that control the lion’s share of the U.S. meat market — were infected with the coronavirus during the pandemic’s first year, according to a report the subcommittee released Wednesday on its findings. At least 269 workers across these companies died of covid-19 between March 1, 2020, and Feb. 1.”

‘Couldn’t Believe How Unsafe It Was’: Kiss’ Roadies Blame Lax Covid Protocols for Guitar Tech’s Death (Rolling Stone)

Rolling Stone: ‘Couldn’t Believe How Unsafe It Was’: Kiss’ Roadies Blame Lax Covid Protocols for Guitar Tech’s Death. “In the wake of tragedy, members of the tour seem eager to place blame: Some of [Francis] Stueber’s fellow roadies point to what they perceived to be lax Covid-19 safety protocols as the culprit; while the band reveals that workers concealed sickness and even faked vaccine cards in some cases. Either way, as the pandemic continues to imperil the live-music business — and artists fight to get back on the road to work — situations like these beg the question: How much is enough when it comes to keeping bands on the road and their teams safe? ”

‘It is becoming unbearable:’ Journalists say they have become ‘scapegoats’ at anti-vaccine protests (Committee to Protect Journalists)

Committee to Protect Journalists: ‘It is becoming unbearable:’ Journalists say they have become ‘scapegoats’ at anti-vaccine protests. “Journalists in Europe told CPJ that some protesters target members of the press, who they see as representing the same forces they are rallying against. While most of the reporters vowed to continue their coverage of demonstrations against lockdowns, masks, and COVID vaccines, some also voiced concern that reporters—especially those without institutional support, like freelancers—may not be able to continue much longer.”

Route Fifty: Employers Have Been Offering the Wrong Office Amenities

Route Fifty: Employers Have Been Offering the Wrong Office Amenities. “I oversee the Healthy Buildings program at Harvard’s public-health school. Our research focuses on how indoor air affects cognition and other aspects of human well-being. (I should note that I also advise businesses, nonprofits, government leaders, and real-estate companies on ventilation and other healthy-building strategies.) In the United States, an engineering guideline known as ‘acceptable indoor air quality’ governs how much air is brought into a building. The problem is right there in the name: I don’t know about you, but I don’t want acceptable air quality; I want good air quality. Instead of being designed to meet a bare-minimum standard, buildings should optimize human health.”

Business Insider: A Missouri hospital is giving employees panic buttons to address rising attacks on healthcare workers during the pandemic

Business Insider: A Missouri hospital is giving employees panic buttons to address rising attacks on healthcare workers during the pandemic. “By the end of this year, staff who work in the emergency room and inpatient hospital rooms at Cox Medical Center Branson will be able to use a panic button that alerts security who can then track the employee’s location, the facility said in a Facebook announcement. In their post, the facility said that assaults on staff by patients have tripled in the past year. Total assaults rose from 40 in 2019 to 123 in 2020. Total injuries rose from 17 in 2019 to 78 in 2020, the facility said.”

Safety+Health: New website offers health and safety resources for farmers and ranchers

Safety+Health: New website offers health and safety resources for farmers and ranchers. “Launched by the AgriSafe Network, an international nonprofit representing health and safety professionals, the website combines the organization’s learning management system, which includes fact sheets, webinars and safety information, with health topics such as COVID-19, heat-related illness, opioids and mental health.”

Denver Post: Lamborn dismissed pandemic as hoax meant to derail Trump’s reelection, ex-staffer says in sworn statement

Denver Post: Lamborn dismissed pandemic as hoax meant to derail Trump’s reelection, ex-staffer says in sworn statement. “Allegations that U.S. Rep. Doug Lamborn, R-Colorado Springs, fired a staffer in retaliation after the staffer sought to protect himself and others during the pandemic are true, another former staffer said in sworn statements filed Friday. Those sworn statements come from Joshua Hosler, former chair of the El Paso County Republican Party and former district director for Lamborn. Attorney Les Alderman filed them in federal court as part of Brandon Pope’s lawsuit against the eight-term congressman.”

The Verge: Apple places female engineering program manager on administrative leave after tweeting about sexism in the office

The Verge: Apple places female engineering program manager on administrative leave after tweeting about sexism in the office. “Apple has placed senior engineering program manager Ashley Gjøvik on indefinite administrative leave after she tweeted about sexism in the office. The company is currently investigating claims Gjøvik made about a hostile work environment.”

The Verge: Amazon ordered to temporarily close facility near Toronto due to increase in COVID-19 cases

The Verge: Amazon ordered to temporarily close facility near Toronto due to increase in COVID-19 cases. “A public health authority has ordered Amazon to close one of its fulfillment centers in Canada for two weeks because of an uptick in the rate of COVID-19 infections at the facility. A public health investigation found that while the rate of COVID-19 infections has been decreasing in the area, the rate inside the Brampton facility, near Toronto, ‘has been increasing significantly.’”

Washington Post: Hundreds of covid cases reported at Tesla plant following Musk’s defiant reopening, county data shows

Washington Post: Hundreds of covid cases reported at Tesla plant following Musk’s defiant reopening, county data shows. “Tesla’s Bay Area production plant recorded hundreds of covid-19 cases following CEO Elon Musk’s defiant reopening of the plant in May, according to county-level data obtained by a legal transparency website. The document, obtained by the website PlainSite following a court ruling this year, showed Tesla received around 10 reports of covid-19 in May when the plant reopened, and saw a steady rise in cases all the way up to 125 in December, as the disease caused by the novel coronavirus peaked around the country.”

Wall Street Journal: OSHA’s Job Is Workplace Safety. In the Covid-19 Pandemic, It Often Struggled.

Wall Street Journal: OSHA’s Job Is Workplace Safety. In the Covid-19 Pandemic, It Often Struggled.. “The Occupational Safety and Health Administration faced one of the biggest workplace-safety challenges in its 50-year history when the coronavirus struck. It didn’t meet the moment. Instead of thoroughly investigating complaints of unsafe practices at workplaces, the federal agency and state OSHA agencies it oversees often took limited steps, OSHA records and state health data show, leaving workers more vulnerable to workplace outbreaks.”

Axios: Congress plots COVID pandemic-era office upgrades

Axios: Congress plots COVID pandemic-era office upgrades. “The House plans to renovate members’ suites even though staff are worried about an influx of contractors and D.C. is tightening restrictions on large gatherings, some staffers told Axios. Why it matters: The Capitol has been closed to public tours since March. Work over the holiday season comes as U.S. coronavirus cases spike, Americans beg for more pandemic assistance and food lines grow.”

Brass, Marble, Glass, Laminate, and Steel: Results from Tests of Coronavirus on Five Common Museum and Library Building Materials (Institute of Museum and Library Services)

The Institute of Museum and Library Services: Brass, Marble, Glass, Laminate, and Steel: Results from Tests of Coronavirus on Five Common Museum and Library Building Materials. “The REALM project has released results from the sixth round of tests conducted in a Battelle laboratory that determined how long SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can remain active on five materials commonly used in furnishings, exhibits, and equipment found in museums, libraries, and archives. The tests examined architectural glass, marble, countertop laminate, brass, and powder-coated steel. Samples of each material were inoculated with active virus, allowed to dry, and then placed in an environmentally controlled chamber with no outside light or air.”

EurekAlert: 3D printing — a ‘dusty’ business?

EurekAlert: 3D printing — a ‘dusty’ business?. “To close the substantial gaps in our knowledge, scientists at the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) are investigating which particles are released into the environment and what their properties are. Different substances are released into the air depending on the material used for printing. For example, BfR experts were able to detect particles of the widely-used plastic polylactic acid and copper crystals, among other substances.”