Business Insider: A Chipotle general manager and 4 of his employees quit after a surge of to-go orders drove them to their breaking points

Business Insider: A Chipotle general manager and 4 of his employees quit after a surge of to-go orders drove them to their breaking points. “Peter Guerra, a Chipotle veteran of five years and general manager for six months, worked at the Scofield Farms Chipotle location in Austin, Texas. ‘My store was severely understaffed, we struggled just to keep our heads above water,’ with less and less support from management, Guerra said. He said he was regularly scheduled to work 80 hours a week, but often had to work additional hours to cover for employees who quit and left gaps in staffing.”

The Conversation: The ‘great resignation’ is a trend that began before the pandemic – and bosses need to get used to it

The Conversation: The ‘great resignation’ is a trend that began before the pandemic – and bosses need to get used to it. “As a professor of human resource management, I examine how employment and the work environment have changed over time and the impact this has on organizations and communities. While the current resignation behavior may seem like a new trend, data shows employee turnover has been rising steadily for the past decade and may simply be the new normal employers are going to have to get used to.”

Washington Post: ‘It’s a walkout!’

Washington Post: ‘It’s a walkout!’. “The discontent driving the Bradford workers and so many others had been there for years, an ever-present aspect of an economy that could be especially cruel to anyone without an education. The pandemic — the fights with customers over masks and the fears of falling sick — added to the strain. But it was the labor shortages, which extended to just about every part of the country, that caused workers’ long-suppressed anger to burst into the open.”

Route Fifty: The ‘Great Resignation’ is an Opportunity for Local Government to Create Purpose for Employees

Route Fifty: The ‘Great Resignation’ is an Opportunity for Local Government to Create Purpose for Employees. “The ‘Great Resignation’ has led to discussions amongst local government leaders about why workers are leaving and how to keep them. Recent data has shown that the pandemic has caused the nature of work to change. According to a survey from McKinsey in April, nearly two-thirds of U.S.-based employees said that Covid-19 has caused them to reflect on their purpose in life. Nearly half said they are reconsidering the kind of work they do.”

MakeUseOf: LinkedIn Launches Service Marketplace, but Can It Compete With Fiverr and Upwork?

MakeUseOf: LinkedIn Launches Service Marketplace, but Can It Compete With Fiverr and Upwork?. “Freelancers can now find work projects on LinkedIn. The popular professional social network is opening up opportunities for professionals to find work on its platform, going beyond merely giving them the tools to advertise their skills and experience. LinkedIn will do this through Service Marketplace, a new feature to compete with the likes of Fiverr and Upwork, but does Marketplace stand a chance against these platforms? Let’s find out.”

CU Denver News: The Great Resignation & the Benefits of Quitting

CU Denver News: The Great Resignation & the Benefits of Quitting. “Outside a Burger King in Lincoln, Nebraska, employees put up a sign before leaving their posts. It read, ‘WE ALL QUIT’—and the photos quickly went viral. The employees who quit represent a major shift in U.S. employment, with increasing groups of people quitting, especially in industries like hospitality and health care. What has become known as “The Great Resignation” comes after more than 18 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. What exactly is happening with the country’s workforce?”

BuzzFeed News: Americans Are Overworked And Over Work

BuzzFeed News: Americans Are Overworked And Over Work. “In a mass exit dubbed the ‘Great Resignation’ by psychologist Anthony Klotz, nearly 4 million people left jobs this past June, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey. Another 4 million left in July, the fourth consecutive month of such high departure rates. In August, 4.3 million people left their jobs, a record number, according to CNBC. Labor economist Julia Pollak, who works for ZipRecruiter, told me that in normal times, ‘there are typically 3.5 million people quitting a job any month … That’s a substantially higher number, and employers are really feeling it.’ Karin Kimbrough, chief economist at LinkedIn, told me in a recent interview that the “social contract [of] work is being rewritten,” and the balance of power that exists between employer and employee “is shifting towards the worker.””

Route Fifty: Employers Have Been Offering the Wrong Office Amenities

Route Fifty: Employers Have Been Offering the Wrong Office Amenities. “I oversee the Healthy Buildings program at Harvard’s public-health school. Our research focuses on how indoor air affects cognition and other aspects of human well-being. (I should note that I also advise businesses, nonprofits, government leaders, and real-estate companies on ventilation and other healthy-building strategies.) In the United States, an engineering guideline known as ‘acceptable indoor air quality’ governs how much air is brought into a building. The problem is right there in the name: I don’t know about you, but I don’t want acceptable air quality; I want good air quality. Instead of being designed to meet a bare-minimum standard, buildings should optimize human health.”

Harvard Business School: Managers, Your Employees Don’t Want to Be Facebook ‘Friends’

Harvard Business School: Managers, Your Employees Don’t Want to Be Facebook ‘Friends’. “It can be challenging to navigate the boundaries between our workplace and personal lives, causing us to weigh whether to bring a plus-one to the office party or keep a family photo on our desk. But social media adds a whole new level of complexity, and today many employees are hesitant to ‘friend’ ​colleagues and managers online, fearing that the connection could come with career risks, according to a recent study in the Academy of Management Journal.”

ZDNet: Preparing for the ‘golden age’ of artificial intelligence and machine learning

ZDNet: Preparing for the ‘golden age’ of artificial intelligence and machine learning. “Can businesses trust decisions that artificial intelligence and machine learning are churning out in increasingly larger numbers? Those decisions need more checks and balances — IT leaders and professionals have to ensure that AI is as fair, unbiased, and as accurate as possible. This means more training and greater investments in data platforms. A new survey of IT executives conducted by ZDNet found that companies need more data engineers, data scientists, and developers to deliver on these goals.”

Washington Post: Workers are putting on pants to return to the office only to be on Zoom all day

Washington Post: Workers are putting on pants to return to the office only to be on Zoom all day. “As many office workers head back to the office — even as the delta variant spreads across the United States — employees are facing a bizarre new reality: They’re still spending most of their time isolated and glued to their computers for Zoom meetings, email and Slack. With more companies implementing permanent hybrid working options — in which some employees work from home and others in the office — the virtual nature of work may far outlive the pandemic. And with it, so may the quirks of the new office environment.”

The Register: ‘It takes a hell of a mental toll’ – techies who lost work due to COVID share their stories

The Register: ‘It takes a hell of a mental toll’ – techies who lost work due to COVID share their stories. “Pat Christensen’s* COVID layoff came earlier in 2020, and at an earlier point in his career. As the year commenced, Christensen worked in New York State as a developer at a software vendor that was stretching towards security products. As the COVID-19 pandemic gathered pace in February and March, Christensen was promoted into a new role designed to help make that stretch – and was thrilled at the chance to move his career towards security. In May, the axe fell.”