VOX: Measuring the welfare effects of AI and automation

VOX: Measuring the welfare effects of AI and automation . “Artificial intelligence promises economic growth as well as creating fear for those whose jobs it may replace. This column takes a wider approach to examining how AI and other technologies will affect citizens’ welfare beyond just their income. It argues that the new technologies are intrinsically neither good nor bad, it is how they are deployed and how the transition is crafted that conditions the welfare dynamics of societies.”

Washington Post: Inside Facebook, the second-class workers who do the hardest job are waging a quiet battle

Washington Post: Inside Facebook, the second-class workers who do the hardest job are waging a quiet battle. “The thousands of people who do the bulk of Facebook’s work keeping the site free of suicides, massacres and other graphic posts are not Facebook employees. As contractors employed by outsourcing firms, these content moderators don’t get Facebook’s cushy six-month maternity leave, aren’t allowed to invite friends or family to the company cafeteria, and earn a starting wage that is 14 percent of the median Facebook salary.”

Bloomberg: Googlers Protest Retaliation; Even Some Facebook Staff Join Fray

Bloomberg: Googlers Protest Retaliation; Even Some Facebook Staff Join Fray. “At over a dozen offices of Alphabet Inc.’s Google, workers staged sit-ins, with the largest protests drawing hundreds of workers, according to people who attended. Employees told personal stories about suffering retaliation, and in some cases discussed the possibility of forming a union. At Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, California, an employee activist in a cowboy hat handed out flyers to passersby, while discouraging workers from talking to a reporter. In New York, the largest protest, the group posed for a photograph. The organizers then posted it on Twitter – with all the faces blurred out.”

Abacus: Chinese companies are making their employees post ads for them

Abacus: Chinese companies are making their employees post ads for them. “Whether it’s Facebook or Twitter, many of us consider social platforms a place to share our curated personal thoughts. In China, though, people are finding it increasingly difficult to keep work from seeping into their private life online. Workers have been taking to the internet in droves, saying they have been ordered by employers to share company ads with friends in their private WeChat accounts. Some even say their bosses have asked to check their posts to make sure they comply.”

CNET: Google to require full benefits, health care, to contract workers, report says

CNET: Google to require full benefits, health care, to contract workers, report says. “Google said Tuesday it will require temp companies that provide the search giant with temporary and contract workers to provide its staff with full benefits, according to a report by The Hill. Those benefits includes health care, a $15 dollar minimum wage and paid parental leave, the report said, citing to a memo sent to employees.”

The Guardian: The Internet’s Dirtiest Secrets review – the human toll of detoxifying social media

The Guardian: The Internet’s Dirtiest Secrets review – the human toll of detoxifying social media. “We don’t know the name of the woman haunted by images that still make her voice shake when she speaks of them. She is one of tens of thousands of moderators employed by companies in the Philippines, themselves hired by big tech firms, to purge social media platforms of the worst that humanity offers when you give it the chance. Like the rest of her colleagues, she could only speak without risk anonymously.”

Daily Report (Law .com): Regulating Off-Duty Social Media Activity Poses Conflicting Obligations

Daily Report (Law .com): Regulating Off-Duty Social Media Activity Poses Conflicting Obligations. “With work bleeding into life more than ever (and vice versa), one issue commonly facing employers today is how to regulate off-duty social media comments made by employees that negatively impact the workplace. When employers learn of such conduct, they may be tempted to take adverse action against the offending employee(s). Depending on the nature of the comment, however, this may lead to legal liability. On the other hand, employers may be liable for not taking adverse action against employees for their social media activities, such as in the case of harassment. This article provides a high-level overview of these seemingly conflicting obligations and advice on how to navigate them.”