CNET: Amazon workers reportedly plan nationwide protest tied to coronavirus

CNET: Amazon workers reportedly plan nationwide protest tied to coronavirus. “Amazon warehouse workers across the US are reportedly planning to ‘call out sick’ this week as part of a protest demanding more protections amid the coronavirus pandemic. More than 300 workers from at least 50 Amazon facilities plan to take part, according to CNBC.”

Phys .org: Coronavirus lockdowns are pushing mass transit systems to the brink – and low-income riders will pay the price

Phys .org: Coronavirus lockdowns are pushing mass transit systems to the brink – and low-income riders will pay the price. “Steep declines in ridership during the crisis have pushed public transit systems across the U.S. into deep financial distress. Though Congress included allocations for transit in the CARES Act, cities said it won’t be nearly enough. Even major systems in large metro areas like New York City and Washington, D.C., have serious concerns about long-term survival without more sustained support. Failure of transit systems would be a disaster for the large proportion of low income households that depend on buses and trains to get to work and elsewhere—not only in urban areas, but in rural ones too.”

CityLab: Hit Hard by Covid-19, Transit Workers Call for Shutdowns

CityLab: Hit Hard by Covid-19, Transit Workers Call for Shutdowns. “The life of a transit worker was never easy in the United States. Then along came coronavirus. To enable the livelihoods of other essential workers, thousands of bus drivers, track repairers, yard masters, cleaners and others are still showing up to their jobs amid the pandemic. But the death toll among the ranks of front-line public transportation workers, who are considered part of the ‘essential workforce’ in most U.S. cities, suggests they are acutely vulnerable to the virus.”

Exclusive: Amazon in contact with coronavirus test makers as it plans pandemic response (Reuters)

Reuters: Exclusive: Amazon in contact with coronavirus test makers as it plans pandemic response. “Amazon.com Inc has been in contact with the CEOs of two coronavirus test makers as it considers how to screen its staff and reduce the risk of infection at its warehouses, according to internal meeting notes seen by Reuters.”

Coronavirus: Government to pay up to 80% of workers’ wages (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Government to pay up to 80% of workers’ wages. “The government will pay the wages of employees unable to work due to the coronavirus pandemic, in a radical move aimed at protecting people’s jobs. It will pay 80% of salary for staff who are kept on by their employer, covering wages of up to £2,500 a month.”

CNET: Big Tech companies to pay hourly workers affected by coronavirus

CNET: Big Tech companies to pay hourly workers affected by coronavirus. “Google, Twitter, Facebook, Amazon and Apple will continue to pay hourly workers who can’t do their jobs remotely even as big technology companies urge their full-time staff to work from home in order to prevent the spread of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.”

The Verge: How hard will the robots make us work?

The Verge: How hard will the robots make us work?. “On conference stages and at campaign rallies, tech executives and politicians warn of a looming automation crisis — one where workers are gradually, then all at once, replaced by intelligent machines. But their warnings mask the fact that an automation crisis has already arrived. The robots are here, they’re working in management, and they’re grinding workers into the ground.”

Motherboard: Google Workers Are Protesting the Suspension of Two of Their Activist Colleagues

Motherboard: Google Workers Are Protesting the Suspension of Two of Their Activist Colleagues. “Last week, Google placed two workers on administrative leave for violating company policies about accessing and sharing internal documents. On Friday, those two workers, who have now publicly identified themselves as Laurence Berland and Rebecca Rivers, will speak at a worker-led rally outside Google’s offices in San Francisco.”

Fast Company: Better-educated, higher-paid workers will be ‘most affected’ by AI, per new study

Fast Company: Better-educated, higher-paid workers will be ‘most affected’ by AI, per new study. “When it comes to automation, many experts believe that the most vulnerable are the most vulnerable. That is, the jobs that are in the greatest danger of being disrupted, if not altogether displaced, by machines are occupied by blue-collar and front-line service workers—those in ‘lower- wage, lower-education roles’ who perform rote tasks, as a report from the Brookings Institution framed it earlier this year. But a new study from Brookings, being released today, challenges this assumption, at least as it pertains to artificial intelligence. “

Ars Technica: Google fires staffer, suspends two others, amid rising workplace tensions

Ars Technica: Google fires staffer, suspends two others, amid rising workplace tensions. “Google has fired a staffer who allegedly leaked the names of Google employees and their personal details to the news media, Ryan Gallagher reports in a scoop for Bloomberg News. Two other Googlers have been put on leave for violating company policies, Google told Gallagher.”

Bloomberg: The Secret and Frustrating Life of a Google Contract Worker

Bloomberg: The Secret and Frustrating Life of a Google Contract Worker. “More than half of Google’s workers are temporary, vendor or contract staff, known as TVCs. This shadow workforce misses out on many of the famous benefits and perks that have burnished the internet giant’s reputation as one of the world’s best places to work. Last year, a group of TVCs called for better benefits and in September, TVCs working as data analysts in Pittsburgh voted to unionize, a rarity for the tech industry.”

New York Times: The Radical Guidebook Embraced by Google Workers and Uber Drivers

New York Times: The Radical Guidebook Embraced by Google Workers and Uber Drivers. “Just before 20,000 Google employees left their desks last fall to protest the company’s handling of sexual harassment, a debate broke out among the hundreds of workers involved in formulating a list of demands. Some workers argued that they could win fairer pay policies and a full accounting of harassment claims by filing lawsuits or seeking to unionize.”

Motherboard: 45 Google Employees Explain How They Were Retaliated Against for Reporting Abuse

Motherboard: 45 Google Employees Explain How They Were Retaliated Against for Reporting Abuse. “Sexual harassment, gaslighting, broken promises of promotion, gender-based discrimination, and racism. Motherboard has obtained a document written by 45 different Google employees alleging they’ve experienced of all the above. The document lays bare how working at Google—a company whose motto was once ‘don’t be evil’—has become really hard for a lot of people.”