The Verge: Former Facebook manager calls out company for bad treatment of black employees

The Verge: Former Facebook manager calls out company for bad treatment of black employees. “Today, former Facebook partnerships manager Mark Luckie published an internal memo that was sent to his co-workers on his last day at Facebook earlier this month, calling out pervasive discrimination issues within the company. The note argues that Facebook has a ‘black people problem’ that involves the mistreatment of black employees. He cites incidents where managers or colleagues called their co-workers ‘hostile’ or ‘aggressive,’ and others where campus security gave extra scrutiny to black employees.”

Quartz: A new app flags the old tweets that could get you fired

Quartz: A new app flags the old tweets that could get you fired. “It is entirely possible that the words that will end your career prospects for the foreseeable future have been written already, and by your own hand. Plenty of promising job candidates have had their hopes scuppered by a potential employer’s discovery of their foul, ignorant, or otherwise offensive social media posts—posts that may have been written during a younger, more foolish phase, but that the candidates must still bear responsibility for. A wise job candidate is a vigilant curator of their own social media history. One web developer has created a tool to help them do it.”

Low pay, poor prospects, and psychological toll: The perils of microtask work (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: Low pay, poor prospects, and psychological toll: The perils of microtask work. “Microtask platforms recruit humans to do the rating, tagging, review-writing, and poll-taking work that can’t quite be automated with an algorithm yet. In the US, the most common such platform is Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, but other platforms are prominent in other parts of the world. Proponents of this kind of work say that these quick, simple tasks allow people flexible hours to make money, or help ‘fill in the gaps’ for the un- and under-employed. But a new study (PDF) from the United Nations’ International Labor Organization (ILO) questions whether these platforms are as good for society as the Silicon Valley investors and digital evangelists claim.”

Who Are The Workers Behind Amazon’s Mechanical Turk?

Who are the workers behind Amazon’s Mechanical Turk? Actually, it’s kind of depressing. “Data collected by Pew from February of this year say that 51 percent of Mechanical Turkers have a college degree, compared with 36 percent of the adult U.S. workforce. Additionally, 52 percent of Turkers make less than $5 per hour on a job (the federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour), and 39 percent earn between $5 per hour and $7.99 per hour.”