Google Blog: Discover the Memory of the World with UNESCO

Google Blog: Discover the Memory of the World with UNESCO. “On the occasion of International Day of Education, the UNESCO Memory of the World Programme is pleased to join forces with Google Arts & Culture to present Memory of the World, the records that hold the memory of our shared past. The digital collection brings together 66 inscriptions held by institutions across over 30 countries, all listed on the Memory of the World International Register, to tell their stories and highlight key moments in history that have left the world changed forever.”

Scanning the past: The League of Nations archive goes digital (The New Humanitarian)

The New Humanitarian: Scanning the past: The League of Nations archive goes digital. “Archivists and historians are making a permanent digital copy of almost every document, letter, memo, photo, and map from the doomed predecessor of the United Nations. The online League of Nations archives will be a rich resource for understanding the past, dealing with the troubled present, and shaping the future, according to project staffers.”

The imperial roots of global trade: Evidence from a new database (VOX EU)

VOX EU: The imperial roots of global trade: Evidence from a new database. “Throughout history, empires have facilitated trade within their territories by building and securing trade and migration routes, and by imposing common norms, languages, religions, and legal systems, all of which led to the accumulation of imperial capital. This column, based on novel data on the rise and fall of empires over the last 5,000 years, shows that imperial capital has a positive effect on current trade beyond historical legacies such as sharing a language or a religion. This suggests a persistent and previously unexplored influence of long-gone empires on current trade.”

International Business Times Singapore: NTU scientist develops digital tool to study ancient traditional medicines all over the world

International Business Times Singapore: NTU scientist develops digital tool to study ancient traditional medicines all over the world. “In collaboration with the Research Centre for Digital Humanities at the National Taiwan University and recently NTU’s Office of Information, Knowledge and Library Services, Assistant Professor Michael Stanley-Baker designed the digital tools platform DocuSky. This tool was designed to track medical products derived from animals, plants and minerals across different genres of texts—in particular, the digitised Buddhist and Daoist canons, as well as early medical literature.”

What Mexican bugs have to do with Italian Paintings: How digital tools can be used to explore complex connections (American Alliance of Museums)

American Alliance of Museums: What Mexican bugs have to do with Italian Paintings: How digital tools can be used to explore complex connections. “How is a red bug from Mexico so deeply tied to the representation of papal power in the late-1400s? First some background. It all starts with small red bugs, called cochineal, that live on cacti. They were first discovered by the Aztec and Mayan peoples’ thousands of years ago. They learned that the bugs’ bodies produced a chemical which could be used for dye and paint.”