CNET: Google wants better international rules for data requests

CNET: Google wants better international rules for data requests. “We know governments send requests to Google for our data. We know they sometimes get a court order, and they’ve even done so secretly. And though Google puts out a semiannual transparency report giving us a broad sense of how often governments are asking to access private data of its users, Google says a new problem has cropped up: The number of requests from governments outside the US is growing.”

New York Times: Alan Lomax Recordings Are Digitized in a New Online Collection

New York Times: Alan Lomax Recordings Are Digitized in a New Online Collection. “Alan Lomax made it his lifelong mission to archive and share traditional music from around the world. He spent decades in the field, recording heralded artists like Muddy Waters and Woody Guthrie, as well as far more obscure musicians, from the British Isles to Haiti. He also created systems to classify this music and explore the links between cultures. Lomax died in 2002, but the organization he founded, the Association for Cultural Equity (ACE), is hoping to further his research with the Global Jukebox, a new online database.”

Xinhuanet: Aussie researchers develop database detailing fish caught since 1950

Xinhuanet: Aussie researchers develop database detailing fish caught since 1950 . “Australian researchers have compiled an unparalleled database detailing the 5.8 trillion tonnes of global fishing since 1950. The database, created by the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) at the University of Tasmania, was based on more than 867 million fishing records from 1950 to 2014.”

Business Insider: Sir Tim Berners-Lee asks if Twitter is ‘actually a net good for the planet?’

Business Insider: Sir Tim Berners-Lee asks if Twitter is ‘actually a net good for the planet?’. “Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web, on Monday called out Twitter as an example of why many people are ‘re-thinking’ how to regulate the internet.”

TechCrunch: Planet’s new Explorer Beta lets anyone time travel through geospatial images

Wow! From TechCrunch: Planet’s new Explorer Beta lets anyone time travel through geospatial images. “Planet, the global imaging company that recently acquired Google’s Terra Bella satellite imaging business, is introducing a new tool called Planet Explorer Beta that allows its users to view how its image captures of Earth from space change over time. It’s available to the public without a login, which means petty much anyone can check out what a particular spot on the planet looked like over a monthly or quarterly period.”

Phys.org: How social media has synchronized human civilization

Phys.org: How social media has synchronized human civilization. “Human activity, whether commercial or social, contains patterns and moments of synchronicity. In recent years, social media like Twitter has provided an unprecedented volume of data on the daily activities of humans all over the world. Observing this activity on the scale of a city, a continent, or the globe reveals the patterns. In a paper published by the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, researchers at the New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI) have observed a new pattern of synchronized activity: a simultaneous peak of Twitter activity stretching across half the planet, from Europe and Africa to Asia and Oceania.”