Stuff New Zealand: International concern about Internet Archive-National Library deal

Stuff New Zealand: International concern about Internet Archive-National Library deal. “An international group of authors including Sir Philip Pullman are concerned about the National Library’s partnership with the Internet Archive. ‘To find that a great national library like that of New Zealand is collaborating in a scheme to break the cherished copyright laws and give our work away for nothing is profoundly shocking,’ said Pullman, the president of the United Kingdom Society of Authors, in a recent letter sent to the library.”

University of Kansas: Grant Will Give Public Better Access To History Of Black Literature

University of Kansas: Grant Will Give Public Better Access To History Of Black Literature. “It’s the latest extension of [Professor Maryemma] Graham’s [History of Black Writing] project, which she brought with her from the University of Mississippi to Northeastern University and then to KU in 1999. The first stage was to identify and save physical copies of books by Black writers from destruction. The next was to digitize them. And now the organizers are creating tools that will allow both academic researchers and the general public to look at the entire corpus of Black fiction, which HBW has been collecting for nearly 40 years, by using keywords, themes, data visualizations and in other ways that [Drew] Davidson termed ‘metadata.’.”

Introducing American Prison Newspapers, 1800-2020: Voices from the Inside (JSTOR Daily)

JSTOR Daily: Introducing American Prison Newspapers, 1800-2020: Voices from the Inside. “Since 1800, people incarcerated in America have penned articles and organized layouts for hundreds of in-house publications of all sizes, shapes, and lifespans. The American Prison Newspapers archive reflects this diversity. The more than 900 items (and counting) available for open access use include five issues of J-A-B-S, the oldest publication in the archive to date.”

University of Connecticut: History Professor Uncovers Missing Parts of a Prominent Life

University of Connecticut: History Professor Uncovers Missing Parts of a Prominent Life. “Cornelia Dayton, a professor of history at UConn, has helped uncover some missing pieces in the life story of Phillis Wheatley, author of the first volume of poetry published by an African American. In a prize-winning research paper recently published in the New England Quarterly, Dayton describes her findings on the later parts of Wheatley’s life.” A Web site showcasing the research is underway.

Virginia Commonwealth University: New digital project explores the life and legacy of James Branch Cabell, namesake of VCU’s library

Virginia Commonwealth University: New digital project explores the life and legacy of James Branch Cabell, namesake of VCU’s library. “VCU Libraries has launched a digital hub focused on the literary work, impact and life of Richmond writer James Branch Cabell (1879-1958), who was the author of 52 works of fiction and nonfiction and is the namesake of Virginia Commonwealth University’s library on the Monroe Park Campus.”

Florida State University: FSU English professor earns prestigious NEH grant to digitize novelist Gloria Naylor’s work and develop literary archival model

Florida State University: FSU English professor earns prestigious NEH grant to digitize novelist Gloria Naylor’s work and develop literary archival model. “A faculty member in Florida State University’s Department of English has received a collaborative research grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to digitize the work of award-winning American novelist Gloria Naylor and develop a model for engaging Black women’s literary archives.”

Boise State University: A new research tool for Melville lovers: Melville’s Marginalia Online

Boise State University: A new research tool for Melville lovers: Melville’s Marginalia Online. “Melville’s Marginalia Online is a virtual archive and electronic edition of the handwritten notes and markings in books read by American author Herman Melville. Melville’s Marginalia Online also tracks and documents the discovery of volumes from Melville’s library, which was dispersed after his death in 1891. Scholars and students of literature will be able to gain insights about influences on Melville including the work works of Homer, Shakespeare, and Melville’s friend and fellow writer, Nathaniel Hawthorne.”

Library of Congress: Library of Congress National Book Festival Announces Children’s and Teens Author Lineup

Library of Congress: Library of Congress National Book Festival Announces Children’s and Teens Author Lineup. “The 2021 Library of Congress National Book Festival will include an extraordinary lineup of authors for children, teens and kids of all ages – all featured in videos on demand accessible from the start of the festival, which runs Sept. 17-26. Five children’s authors and five teen authors will also participate in live, online Q&A events Sept. 25 and 26.”

Asbarez: Hagop Oshagan’s Work Now Available Online

Asbarez: Hagop Oshagan’s Work Now Available Online. “The entire oeuvre of Hagop Oshagan, one of the giants of Western Armenian Literature, is now online and easily accessible to all, free of charge. The digitized materials can be found on the website of the Digital Library of Classical Armenian Literature (Digilib) of the American University of Armenia. The project was supported by the Armenian Communities Department of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation.” The Web site is in Armenian, of course, and while Google Translate handled the site navigation okay, it appeared to mangle the Oshagan works. I could make neither heads or tails of the few translated works at which I looked.

“Knowledge”: Online Exhibit Celebrates Benson Centennial And Diversity Of Thought In The Americas (TexLibris)

TexLibris: “Knowledge”: Online Exhibit Celebrates Benson Centennial And Diversity Of Thought In The Americas. “A new online exhibition, A Hemisphere of Knowledge: A Benson Centennial Exhibit, accessible in English, Spanish, and Portuguese, explores the implications of [Cuban poet and philosopher José] Martí’s words across time and cultures, using a wealth of resources available at the Benson Latin American Collection.

TIME: How Extortion Scams and Review Bombing Trolls Turned Goodreads Into Many Authors’ Worst Nightmare

This is from early August and I missed it. TIME: How Extortion Scams and Review Bombing Trolls Turned Goodreads Into Many Authors’ Worst Nightmare. “Scammers and cyberstalkers are increasingly using the Goodreads platform to extort authors with threats of ‘review bombing’ their work–and they are frequently targeting authors from marginalized communities who have spoken out on topics ranging from controversies within the industry to larger social issues on social media.”

Aleteia: Take a trip through hell, purgatory and heaven with 100 Days of Dante

Aleteia: Take a trip through hell, purgatory and heaven with 100 Days of Dante. “100 Days of Dante is a new website through which modern seekers and pilgrims can follow the great epic poem with free video presentations three times a week. The journey begins on September 14, the date of Dante’s death in 1321, and concludes on Easter 2022. The three books of the Divine Comedy, known in Italian as Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso, are divided into 33 chapters known as cantos. Each video will present one canto, with commentary on it from leading experts in Dante studies.”

Mashable: On TikTok, being ‘written by a woman’ is the ultimate compliment

Mashable: On TikTok, being ‘written by a woman’ is the ultimate compliment. “Male authors have been accused of writing women as one-dimensional beings with little development compared to their male counterparts. Women written by men are also infamous for being described in vivid, unnecessary detail. Discussions about men written by women and women written by men have been brewing on TikTok for months, inspiring a meme in which users transcended the gender dichotomy.”

Liverpool Echo: Birkenhead’s little known links to the father of science fiction

Liverpool Echo: Birkenhead’s little known links to the father of science fiction. “John [Lamb] has used his research to create a new website, ‘Jules Verne and the Heroes of Birkenhead’ after finding no real reference of the author’s links to Merseyside online. His articles exploring the ties between his books and the area are being serialised and he said more will be revealed in the coming weeks.” Limited at the moment but more to come. The Web design is charmingly 1998. It even has a visitor counter.