University of Iowa: First Annual Ray Bradbury Read-A-Thon

University of Iowa: First Annual Ray Bradbury Read-A-Thon. “On Saturday, August 22, 2020, the University of Iowa Libraries will partner with national organizations to present the first annual Ray Bradbury Read-A-Thon. During this four-hour online event, a diverse group of celebrities and Bradbury experts, including Peter Balestrieri, curator of science fiction and popular culture collections at the University of Iowa Libraries Special Collections & Archives, will present a virtual reading of Bradbury’s classic novel Fahrenheit 451 streamed over YouTube beginning at 3:30 pm CDT.” The event has already occurred but the stream is still available over YouTube. Also, it’s more like six hours.

CBC: L.M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables manuscript going online

CBC: L.M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables manuscript going online. “Starting in 2022, people will be able to read Anne of Green Gables online thanks to a new digital version of Lucy Maud Montgomery’s original manuscript. The hand-written manuscript will be the centrepiece of a digital exhibition involving the Confederation Centre Art Gallery (CCAG) and the University of Prince Edward Island’s L.M. Montgomery Institute and the Robertson Library.”

PBS: Writer Milan Kundera donating archive to Czech library

PBS: Writer Milan Kundera donating archive to Czech library. “Milan Kundera, the 91-year-old author of ‘The Unbearable Lightness of Being’ and other acclaimed novels, has decided to donate his private library and archive to a public library in the Czech city where he was born and spent his childhood. The Moravian Library in the city of Brno said Thursday that the entire collection would be transported from Kundera’s apartment in Paris in the fall.”

British Library: Shakespeare’s only surviving playscript now online

British Library: Shakespeare’s only surviving playscript now online. “One of the most iconic literary manuscripts by one of the world’s most famous playwrights, William Shakespeare (1564–1616), can now be viewed in full online on the British Library’s Digitised Manuscripts site. The Booke of Sir Thomas Moore does not immediately spring to mind as among Shakespeare’s masterpieces. This late 16th or early 17th-century play is not always included among the Shakespearean canon, and it was not until the 1800s that it was even associated with the Bard of Avon. So what is the connection with William Shakespeare, the author of the more distinguished Hamlet, Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet?”

RTE: Re: Joyce! 29-hour Ulysses to air on RTÉ radio this Bloomsday

RTE: Re: Joyce! 29-hour Ulysses to air on RTÉ radio this Bloomsday. “RTÉ has announced that an almost 30-hour production of James Joyce’s masterpiece Ulysses will be broadcast on its DAB and online worldwide channel RTÉ Radio 1 Extra to celebrate Bloomsday. The full dramatised production – originally broadcast in 1982 to celebrate the centenary of Joyce, and totalling 29 hours and 45 minutes in duration – will begin at the same time as both Stephen Dedalus’ and Leopold Bloom’s journey through Dublin begins in the book: 8 am on the 16th of June.”

University at Buffalo: UB to host virtual Bloomsday celebration with Joyce fans around world

University at Buffalo: UB to host virtual Bloomsday celebration with Joyce fans around world. “As the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of James Joyce materials, the UB Poetry Collection will host a distinctive Bloomsday event featuring readings from Ireland’s Ambassador to the United States Daniel Mulhall, acclaimed Irish author Colm Tóibín, New York State Senator Tim Kennedy and other notable guests. The event, scheduled on Tuesday, June 16, from 3-4:30 p.m. EDT, is free and open to the public.”

Evening Standard: Charles Dickens’s earliest surviving letter and handwritten fragment of Oliver Twist on show as museum goes online

Evening Standard: Charles Dickens’s earliest surviving letter and handwritten fragment of Oliver Twist on show as museum goes online. “A fragment of the original Oliver Twist manuscript and its author’s earliest surviving letter have been added to the Charles Dickens Museum’s brand new online collection. The items are among more than 100,000 to be added to the database, which will allow visitors to inspect aspects of the writer’s home, life and work in close detail.”

Adam Matthew Digital announces publication of ‘Nineteenth Century Literary Society: The John Murray Publishing Archive’ (Adam Matthew)

Adam Matthew: Adam Matthew Digital announces publication of ‘Nineteenth Century Literary Society: The John Murray Publishing Archive’. “Drawn from the holdings of the National Library of Scotland, AM Digital’s latest collection, Nineteenth Century Literary Society: The John Murray Publishing Archive is an unparalleled resource for scholars and academics interested in the history of the book, literature and nineteenth-century history. From its inception in 1768, the John Murray publishing house worked with influential authors whose famed titles continue to shape literature to this day, including Jane Austen, Sir Walter Scott, Herman Melville and Lord Byron.” If you’re not familiar with Adam Matthew, I’ll let you know it’s not free.

Haslemere Herald: New website offers sneak peak at Jane Austen House’s collection

Haslemere Herald: New website offers sneak peak at Jane Austen House’s collection. “JANE Austen’s House in Chawton has announced a number of newly-acquired objects via its new website, which launched last week. Short videos will also be shared via social media, allowing the public a sneak peek at the new treasures in the house’s collection while its doors are closed during the Covid-19 outbreak.”

The Guardian: So long and thanks for all the fish

The Guardian: So long and thanks for all the fish. “I am sorry to have to inform readers of the Guardian’s long-running Ask Jack column that its much-loved author, Jack Schofield, died on Tuesday. Jack was taken to hospital on Friday night following a heart attack and died on Tuesday afternoon.” I wrote for Jack several times in the early 2000s. He always had a kind word and I always looked forward to working with him. I’ll miss him.

NaNoWriMo: #StayHomeWriMo

NaNoWriMo: #StayHomeWriMo. “#StayHomeWriMo is an initiative to help your physical, mental, social, and creative well-being. We’ll have seven weekdays of support for you leading up to Camp NaNoWriMo in April, and you can join us regardless of whether you’re planning to write for Camp. Let’s do this (6 feet apart but) together.”

New York Times: Without Places to Gather, Debut Novelists Reimagine Book Promotion

The New York Times: Without Places to Gather, Debut Novelists Reimagine Book Promotion. “For many first-time novelists, years of hard work (and often solitary time) culminate in seeing their book come into the world: going to festivals and bookstores to read sections aloud and connecting with readers face to face, inhabiting with others the worlds they built. But with social distancing guidelines discouraging gatherings of more than 10 people, publishing a debut has changed in ways that authors couldn’t have foreseen just a few weeks ago. We spoke to several debut novelists about their books, their plans to promote their work and their days during this unusual time.”

Phys .org: Crowdsourcing plot lines to help the creative process

Phys .org: Crowdsourcing plot lines to help the creative process. “Creative authors could soon have a new option to help overcome writer’s block, thanks to a system launched by researchers in the College of Information Sciences and Technology at Penn State. The crowd-powered system, called Heteroglossia, enables writers to elicit story ideas from the online crowd.”

‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time. “The 15th-century conduct book, The Lytille Childrenes Lytil Boke, was intended to teach table manners. It has been put online as part of a new children’s literature website bringing together original manuscripts, interviews and drafts by authors from Lewis Carroll to Jacqueline Wilson. The medieval text is part of the British Library’s own collection, and ‘by listing all the many things that medieval children should not do, it also gives us a hint of the mischief they got up to’, said the library.”

Reed Magazine: Collecting the Untold Stories

Reed Magazine: Collecting the Untold Stories. “For fifty years, African American author Charles W. Chesnutt (1858-1932) wrote stories that chronicled the complexities of race in America. A formidable craftsman, he published in newspapers and elite magazines such as The Atlantic. While some of his stories have appeared in major anthologies, they represent just a tiny fraction of his literary output. Most of his writing—writing that provides key insight into America after the Civil War—is out of print and hard to find. Now, thanks to a $206,330 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Prof. Sarah Wagner-McCoy [English] and her collaborators will produce a scholarly edition of his stories.”