Rest of World: Werewolf erotica is the latest global gig work trend

Rest of World: Werewolf erotica is the latest global gig work trend . “The emerging web novel industry spans the globe, taking a business model from Asia, assembling a global supply chain of authors in lower-income countries, and paying them to churn out thousands of words a day for English-speaking readers in the West. Rest of World spoke to four current and former employees at these platforms, who described how the art of novel writing is broken down into a formula to be followed: take a popular theme like werewolves, sprinkle it with certain tropes like a forbidden romance, and write as many chapters as you can.”

The Verge: The Great Fiction of AI

The Verge: The Great Fiction of AI. “In order to survive in a marketplace where infinite other options are a click away, authors need to find their fans and keep them loyal. So they follow readers to the microgenres into which Amazon’s algorithms classify their tastes, niches like ‘mermaid young adult fantasy’ or ‘time-travel romance,’ and keep them engaged by writing in series, each installment teasing the next, which already has a title and set release date, all while producing a steady stream of newsletters, tweets, and videos.”

Broadway World: The Latine Musical Theatre Lab Launches A Database Of Latine Writers

Broadway World: The Latine Musical Theatre Lab Launches A Database Of Latine Writers . “The database currently features 100 Latiné musical theatre writers – librettists, lyricists, and composers. Each artist has an individual profile that shares their base city, pronouns, identities, social media handles, and a link to their personal website that directs the user to learn more about each writer, their music, and the stories they tell.” I wasn’t sure what “Latiné” indicated, but apparently it’s an alternative to Latinx.

WIRED: Bookstagram Is Fueling an Unnerving Trend

WIRED: Bookstagram Is Fueling an Unnerving Trend. “Readers and reviewers have never been more able to get their voices heard. The rise of Bookstagram and more recently BookTok have enabled bibliophiles to share recommendations, point out plot holes, and discuss fan theories on an unprecedented scale. Yet writers want you to know that it’s one thing to tell the world that you don’t like a book, and another thing entirely to tell its author.”

The Verge: Substack CEO says he’s ‘very sorry’ about laying off 13 people

The Verge: Substack CEO says he’s ‘very sorry’ about laying off 13 people. “Substack is the latest tech company to announce layoffs, with the company’s CEO Chris Best tweeting on Wednesday that he’s letting 13 workers go. According to Axios, that’s around 14 percent of Substack’s workforce. In his letter and follow-up tweets, Best cites ‘market conditions’ as the reason behind the layoffs.”

The Guardian: Future Library opens secret archive of unseen texts in Oslo

The Guardian: Future Library opens secret archive of unseen texts in Oslo. “On Sunday the Future Library, a project dreamed up by the Scottish artist Katie Paterson, was opened to the public in Oslo. After eight years, manuscripts penned by some of the world’s most famous living authors were delivered to ‘The silent room’ on the top floor of the Deichman library, where they will remain for the next 92 years.”

University of Oxford: 50-year project reveals new insights about the evolution and influence of Voltaire’s thought

University of Oxford: 50-year project reveals new insights about the evolution and influence of Voltaire’s thought. “This important work by researchers from the Voltaire Foundation at the University of Oxford has uncovered new insights about the evolution and influence of Voltaire’s thought…. The project team now plan to digitise the entire collection of Voltaire’s work to enable detailed analysis by scholars and researchers from all over the world. This new challenge aims to establish a new cutting-edge digital hub for the humanities in Oxford with a focus on digital research.”

TechCrunch: Copper is building ‘the Instagram for book lovers’

TechCrunch: Copper is building ‘the Instagram for book lovers’. “The founder and CEO of Copper, Allison Trowbridge wanted to build a social network that revolves around books, connecting authors and fans through in-app discussions and live events. As an author herself, she also wanted to help writers find new income streams, whether that’s through ticketed virtual events, or just generating enough conversation around a book that more people buy it.”

Huntington Herald-Dispatch: Decades after his death, Marshall students archive forgotten Huntington writer’s work

Huntington Herald-Dispatch: Decades after his death, Marshall students archive forgotten Huntington writer’s work . “”Students at Marshall University got a chance this semester to embrace Appalachian literature, while also making sure a Huntington writer will not be forgotten again. Michael Martin and Krys Smith, sophomores at Marshall, said they signed up for professor Stefan Schoberlein’s Appalachian literature class this spring expecting to read books and take quizzes, but the professor had other plans in mind after he heard of writer Tom Kromer on NPR.”

Motherboard: Google’s AI-Powered ‘Inclusive Warnings’ Feature Is Very Broken

Motherboard: Google’s AI-Powered ‘Inclusive Warnings’ Feature Is Very Broken. “Starting this month—21 years after Microsoft turned off Clippy because people hated it so much—Google is rolling out a new feature called ‘assistive writing’ that butts into your prose to make style and tone notes on word choice, concision, and inclusive language…. this feature is showing up for end users in Google Docs, one of the company’s most widely-used products, and it’s annoying as hell.”

Camden New Journal: Education pioneer Beryl Gilroy’s archive to be made public

Camden New Journal: Education pioneer Beryl Gilroy’s archive to be made public. “UNPUBLISHED manuscripts by an inspirational headteacher are to be made public in a new archive obtained by the British Library. Beryl Gilroy, who ran Beckford School in the 1970s, was one of the first black headteachers in this country. But she was also celebrated for a large body of fiction and non-fiction about women, children and migration.”

Smithsonian Magazine: Rarely Seen Paintings by J.R.R. Tolkien Portray a Lush ‘Lord of the Rings’ Landscape

Smithsonian Magazine: Rarely Seen Paintings by J.R.R. Tolkien Portray a Lush ‘Lord of the Rings’ Landscape. “The Lord of the Rings author was also a skilled artist who sketched, painted and mapped the worlds that he was imagining as he wrote about them. Many of the original illustrations in the Hobbit were created by Tolkien himself. Audiences can now view a selection of Tolkien’s rarely seen Lord of the Rings artworks for free via the Tolkien Estate’s newly updated website, reports Sarah Cascone for Artnet. The portal, which debuted last month, also allows viewers to explore documents, images and audio clips related to Tolkien’s personal life and his lesser-known pursuits as a mapmaker, calligrapher and artist.”