Maryland Today: How AI Could Help Writers Spot Stereotypes

Maryland Today: How AI Could Help Writers Spot Stereotypes. “Studious Asians, sassy yet helpless women and greedy shopkeepers: These tired stereotypes of literature and film not only often offend the people they caricature, but can drag down what might otherwise have been a compelling narrative. Researchers at the University of Maryland’s Human-Computer Interaction Lab are working to combat these clichés with the creation of DramatVis Personae (DVP), a web-based visual analytics system powered by artificial intelligence that helps writers identify stereotypes they might be unwittingly giving fictional form among their cast of characters (or dramatis personae).”

UGA Today: Did my computer say it best?

UGA Today: Did my computer say it best?. “With autocorrect and auto-generated email responses, algorithms offer plenty of assistance to help people express themselves. But new research from the University of Georgia shows people who rely on computer algorithms for assistance with language-related, creative tasks didn’t improve their performance and were more likely to trust low-quality advice.”

Cairo Scene: The Digital Archive Preserving The Fading Art Of Egyptian Typography

Cairo Scene: The Digital Archive Preserving The Fading Art Of Egyptian Typography. “Exclusively focused on Arabic street typography in Egypt, the Egyptian Type Archive has amassed a loyal community on Instagram. They collectively document any text they stumble upon, from the quirky to the horrific to the beautiful, whether it’s an ancient sign on a vintage shop or an announcement sprayed on the walls of a local cafe.”

NiemanLab: Medium’s new CEO on the company’s journalism mistakes, bundle economics, and life after Ev Williams

NiemanLab: Medium’s new CEO on the company’s journalism mistakes, bundle economics, and life after Ev Williams . “The fate of a blogging platform may have somewhat lower stakes than some of the subjects we usually discuss around here. But a key question at the intersection of tech and democracy is what sort of publishing models the internet will support. How many journalists and other writers will be able to make a living? How will their work find an audience? And will the platforms they operate on ever find long-term stability?”

Boing Boing: New BB series! “Updating the Historical Dictionary of Science Fiction”

New-to-me, from Boing Boing: New BB series! “Updating the Historical Dictionary of Science Fiction”. “The HDSF — based on the OED Science Fiction Citations Project, a 2001 effort to crowdsource quotations for the Oxford English Dictionary — is a full-fledged dictionary of SF on historical principles, meaning that every entry is illustrated with contextual quotations showing exactly how a term has been used over time.”

Yale News: Digital project supports ‘bibliographic turn’ in Black literary studies

Yale News: Digital project supports ‘bibliographic turn’ in Black literary studies. “Yale’s Jacqueline Goldsby and Meredith McGill of Rutgers University recently received a $1.7 million grant from The Mellon Foundation to support the development of The Black Bibliography Project (BBP), an initiative that aims to revive and transform descriptive bibliography for African American and Black Diaspora literary studies.”

Scoop Empire: Reconnecting With The Past: Bibliotheca Alexandria Launches New Website To Teach Hieroglyphics

Scoop Empire: Reconnecting With The Past: Bibliotheca Alexandria Launches New Website To Teach Hieroglyphics. “The word hieroglyph literally translates to ‘sacred carvings’. The Egyptians first used hieroglyphs exclusively for inscriptions carved or painted on temple walls. This form of pictorial writing was also used on tombs, sheets of papyrus, wooden boards, potsherds, and fragments of limestone. It is an essential part of Egyptian history. Now, new initiatives are arising to teach hieroglyphics and one of them is by the Bibliotheca of Alexandria.” The article’s link takes you to the Arabic version of the Web site. Look for the English switch on the upper left part of the landing page.

Rest of World: Werewolf erotica is the latest global gig work trend

Rest of World: Werewolf erotica is the latest global gig work trend . “The emerging web novel industry spans the globe, taking a business model from Asia, assembling a global supply chain of authors in lower-income countries, and paying them to churn out thousands of words a day for English-speaking readers in the West. Rest of World spoke to four current and former employees at these platforms, who described how the art of novel writing is broken down into a formula to be followed: take a popular theme like werewolves, sprinkle it with certain tropes like a forbidden romance, and write as many chapters as you can.”

The Verge: The Great Fiction of AI

The Verge: The Great Fiction of AI. “In order to survive in a marketplace where infinite other options are a click away, authors need to find their fans and keep them loyal. So they follow readers to the microgenres into which Amazon’s algorithms classify their tastes, niches like ‘mermaid young adult fantasy’ or ‘time-travel romance,’ and keep them engaged by writing in series, each installment teasing the next, which already has a title and set release date, all while producing a steady stream of newsletters, tweets, and videos.”

Broadway World: The Latine Musical Theatre Lab Launches A Database Of Latine Writers

Broadway World: The Latine Musical Theatre Lab Launches A Database Of Latine Writers . “The database currently features 100 Latiné musical theatre writers – librettists, lyricists, and composers. Each artist has an individual profile that shares their base city, pronouns, identities, social media handles, and a link to their personal website that directs the user to learn more about each writer, their music, and the stories they tell.” I wasn’t sure what “Latiné” indicated, but apparently it’s an alternative to Latinx.

WIRED: Bookstagram Is Fueling an Unnerving Trend

WIRED: Bookstagram Is Fueling an Unnerving Trend. “Readers and reviewers have never been more able to get their voices heard. The rise of Bookstagram and more recently BookTok have enabled bibliophiles to share recommendations, point out plot holes, and discuss fan theories on an unprecedented scale. Yet writers want you to know that it’s one thing to tell the world that you don’t like a book, and another thing entirely to tell its author.”

Fast Company: The secretly powerful little app that you could write an entire book in

Fast Company: The secretly powerful little app that you could write an entire book in. “I started writing a novel one evening a week when my oldest child was a baby. I’ve just completed a big rewrite and finally feel ready to take the next steps toward getting my story out into the world….. My lifeline: Google Keep, a simple note-taking app. For anyone else writing a book in the few minutes scattered throughout your day, here’s how I did it—and how you can, too.”

The Verge: Substack CEO says he’s ‘very sorry’ about laying off 13 people

The Verge: Substack CEO says he’s ‘very sorry’ about laying off 13 people. “Substack is the latest tech company to announce layoffs, with the company’s CEO Chris Best tweeting on Wednesday that he’s letting 13 workers go. According to Axios, that’s around 14 percent of Substack’s workforce. In his letter and follow-up tweets, Best cites ‘market conditions’ as the reason behind the layoffs.”