Tribune India: 100 years later, voices from WWI

Tribune India: 100 years later, voices from WWI. “Ten years ago, voice of Mal Singh, a prisoner of war from the First World War, came to India. Held captive at the Half Moon Camp in Germany, the man was batting for hope, remembering the good times in India — the butter he would eat and the milk he would drink…. He was desperate to return home, but doubted if he ever would.” Some of these testimonies are now on YouTube.

News Australia: New database will preserve records of Gallipoli battlefield artefacts forever

News Australia: New database will preserve records of Gallipoli battlefield artefacts forever. “AN ambitious, 13-year project to survey and preserve artefacts from the battlefields of Gallipoli is finally complete, with almost 2000 items ranging from rum jars to barbed wire, bullet casing and an old lunch-box uncovered.”

Alabama Centennial Blog: We Need YOU to Help Transcribe World War I Service Records!

Alabama Centennial Blog: We Need YOU to Help Transcribe World War I Service Records! . “Earlier this month, as part of its commemoration of the World War I Centennial, the Archives launched the Alabama History DIY: World War I Service Records initiative. Archives staff, volunteers, and student workers spent eighteen months digitizing more than 100,000 index cards with information about the men and women who served in the war. Details ranging from biographical (age, residence, race) to military (enlistment date, branch of service, engagements) make the records a boon to both genealogists and historians. Users of the Archives’ World War I Gold Star Database will find this an excellent supplement, as it also includes survivors of the war. Now that the cards have been scanned, we are seeking volunteers to help us transcribe the information and create a new, searchable resource for our patrons. ”

Northampton Borough Council: Museum creates digital memories of the First World War

Northampton Borough Council: Museum creates digital memories of the First World War. “A First World War digital archive including images of museum objects and family stories relating to Northampton has been created by Northampton Museums and Art Gallery. The archive can be found on Instagram and Flickr, where viewers can browse through a range of objects, photographs, documents and oral histories and share their stories and experiences with others.”

Who Do You Think You Are: Millions of soldiers listed on first national war memorials database

Who Do You Think You Are: Millions of soldiers listed on first national war memorials database. “Over a million names of those killed in the First World War can now be located in a new database of war memorials. The new War Memorials Register, published on the Imperial War Museums (IWM) website, contains around 1,025,000 names from the UK’s War Memorials and Rolls of Honour and over 23,000 images of the memorials. Around two-thirds of the records relate to casualties of the First World War.”

BT: First World War hospital admissions data goes online

BT: First World War hospital admissions data goes online. “Families will be able to find out about their wounded relatives’ treatment during the First World War through a hospital admissions archive which has gone online. Historical records featuring the admissions registers of soldiers cared for by veterans’ charity Erskine from 1916 to 1936 have now been fully digitised.”

PR Newswire: USC Shoah Foundation Adds Large Collection of Armenian Genocide Testimony to its Archive (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: USC Shoah Foundation Adds Large Collection of Armenian Genocide Testimony to its Archive (PRESS RELEASE). “USC Shoah Foundation has received one of the largest collections of testimonies from survivors of the Armenian Genocide that were recorded over decades by Dr. Richard Hovannisian, a leading scholar on the World War I-era genocide. The Richard G. Hovannisian Armenian Genocide Oral History Collection will officially be announced as a part of the Visual History Archive at a ceremony on Friday. The more than 1,000 interviews will constitute the largest non-Holocaust-related collection to be integrated into the Institute’s Visual History Archive. It will also be the Archive’s first audio-only collection.” Only ten are available at the moment. The rest need to be digitized and indexed.