Flickr Blog: Welcome the US Navy Bureau of Medicine to the Flickr Commons!

I haven’t gotten to do one of these in a while, so I’m excited! Flickr Blog: Welcome the US Navy Bureau of Medicine to the Flickr Commons!. “Items in this collection include albums and historical photographs of World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, as well as naval hospitals, including hospital ships, around the world. The collection also includes modern images of the Navy Medicine corps work to ensure the health and well-being of all beneficiaries.”

WNIU: Rockford’s Schreiner Leaves Legacy Of Music

New-to-me, from WNIU: Rockford’s Schreiner Leaves Legacy Of Music. “A longtime collector of rare sheet music has died. Lee Schreiner donated much of his collection to Northern Illinois University where it found new life. In 2014, Lee Schreiner of Rockford started donating his collection to his alma mater. Librarians at Northern Illinois University created an online database for the World War 1 sheet music which is now in the public domain.”

Women Love Tech: Anzac Correspondent Lets You Learn About History With The Use Of AR

Women Love Tech: Anzac Correspondent Lets You Learn About History With The Use Of AR. “With the use of augmented reality, Anzac Correspondent transforms your smartphone or tablet into a vintage 1918 camera that you scan the room with to snap pictures of people, animals, and events of interest from The First World War to relay back home. The app is in fact an expansion on the photos and stories that can be found in Queensland Museum’s Anzac Legacy Gallery, but in a way that is more engaging and dynamic; especially for the younger audience.”

Europeana Pro: The role of community-generated content in the digital legacy of the First World War

Europeana Pro: The role of community-generated content in the digital legacy of the First World War. “The revolution in digital technology and the accessibility to new material via digital storytelling are changing the way researchers are able to look at the period of the First World War. Projects like Europeana 1914-1918, which combines institutional and publicly contributed material, are disrupting the research life cycle and promoting new insights into historical research. Dr. Agiatis Benardou, Senior Researcher at Digital Curation Unit / ATHENA R.C. – a Europeana DSI-4 partner – fills us in.”

Commonwealth War Graves Commission: Digital archive reveals First World War stories

Commonwealth War Graves Commission: Digital archive reveals First World War stories. “More than 800 family stories from the First World War have been preserved for future generations to share in a digital archive, created by the Commonwealth War Graves Foundation and the University of Oxford. Following a series of roadshows and community-led events, the free-to-access Lest We Forget online archive will preserve a snapshot what life was like for the wartime generation.”

Exploring autobiographical writings from prisoners of war: Saverio Vita, Europeana Research Grants Winner (Europeana Pro)

Europeana Pro: Exploring autobiographical writings from prisoners of war: Saverio Vita, Europeana Research Grants Winner . “This year, funding from the Europeana Research Grants Programme has provided support for three early-career scholars to develop their projects related to the theme of the First World War. At the end of their projects, the 2018 Europeana Grant recipients took time out to answer some questions.”

Engadget: ‘Hardcore History’ host Dan Carlin wants you to relive WW1 in VR

Engadget: ‘Hardcore History’ host Dan Carlin wants you to relive WW1 in VR. “With his hit podcast, Hardcore History, Dan Carlin brought his love for the past to the masses. It was only a matter of time until he wanted to move beyond audio — but instead of moving into the crowded world of documentaries, he turned to VR. War Remains, his first virtual reality project which debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival this week, puts you right in the trenches of World War I. And it’s more than just another VR short: Co-producers MWM Immersive built a massive installation for the experience, allowing you to touch and feel the virtual environments in real life. (Thankfully, without recreating the smells of mud, death and gunfire.)”