Wired: One Woman’s Mission to Rewrite Nazi History on Wikipedia

Wired: One Woman’s Mission to Rewrite Nazi History on Wikipedia. “[Ksenia] Coffman can’t recall exactly when her concern set in. Maybe it was when she read the article about the SS, the Nazi Party’s paramilitary, which included images that felt to her like glamour shots—action-man officers admiring maps, going on parade, all sorts of ‘very visually disturbing’ stuff. Or maybe it was when she clicked through some of the pages about German tank gunners, flying aces, and medal winners. There were hundreds of them, and the men’s impressive kill counts and youthful derring-do always seemed to exist outside the genocidal Nazi cause. What was going on here? Wikipedia was supposed to be all about consensus. Wasn’t there consensus on, you know, Hitler?”

The Daily Star: Library of Congress to archive local family’s WWII photos

The Daily Star: Library of Congress to archive local family’s WWII photos. “A collection of nearly a thousand wartime photographs from one local soldier are headed to the Library of Congress next month for permanent archival. Demart Carl Chamberlain, a paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne Division who jumped thrice into combat during World War II, carried with him a handheld Kodak in his deployments across Italy, France and northern Africa.”

Fold3: New POW/MIA Records Added!

Fold3: New POW/MIA Records Added!. “The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) is an agency within the United States Department of Defense. Their mission is to recover the remains of military personnel who are listed as prisoners of war or missing in action from past conflicts. We’ve added a new collection of indexed records for the estimated 82,000 American military and civilian personnel still missing in action. The index covers multiple conflicts including WWII, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Cold War, and more recent conflicts including Operation Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom.”

Korea Times: Hong Kong historians capture horrors of World War II in new website

Korea Times: Hong Kong historians capture horrors of World War II in new website . “Historian Kwong Chi-man wants Hongkongers to remember the horrors of war, and one particularly painful episode from the fall of Hong Kong in December 1941 stands out. Nurses running an orphanage in Fanling in the New Territories were raped and brutalized when Japanese soldiers arrived on December 8 and overran the place.”

The News, Portsmouth: New website built in memory of the COPP commandos who trained at Hayling Island from 1942-45

The News, Portsmouth: New website built in memory of the COPP commandos who trained at Hayling Island from 1942-45. “SERVICEMEN who fought in Burma often claimed they felt they were the ‘Forgotten Army’ with all the attention on liberating Europe. But many special forces units like COPP – Combined Operations Pilotage Parties who trained on Hayling Island – were not even widely known about in the first place.”

Times of Israel: National Library digitizes poet-soldier Hannah Senesh’s literary estate

Times of Israel: National Library digitizes poet-soldier Hannah Senesh’s literary estate. “In honor of the 100th birthday of Hungarian-born soldier and poet Hannah Senesh, who was captured and killed by the Nazis after she parachuted into Hungary during World War II, Israel’s National Library has digitized dozens of items from a recently acquired archive of her possessions.”

Romea: Czech local archive publishes digitalized records online of the former concentration camp for Romani people at Lety

Romea: Czech local archive publishes digitalized records online of the former concentration camp for Romani people at Lety. “News server Denik.cz reports that the State Regional Archive (SOA) in Třeboň, Czech Republic has released on its website its archival collection of digitalized documents about the WWII-era concentration camp called the Zigeunerlager (in Czech, Cikánský tábor) at Lety; the digital collection was created in collaboration with the Institute of the Terezín Initiative in Prague as part of a project called the ‘Database of victims of the national socialist persecution of “gypsies”‘.”

Wyoming News Now: German POW news journals get digitized

Wyoming News Now: German POW news journals get digitized. “The state library just completed the digitization of 5 titles of German POW camp newspapers from World War 2. These newspapers were from the Douglas and Cheyenne war camps. They depicted camp life for prisoners, as well as news that was coming in from Europe at the time. Captured by allies in northern Africa, these prisoners were held in Wyoming, in several camps that were operational from 1942 to 1945.”

Greek Reporter: Greek Antiquities Removed by Occupying Germany, US Archives Reveal

Greek Reporter: Greek Antiquities Removed by Occupying Germany, US Archives Reveal. “A 47-page document in the US National Archives recently unearthed by an English historian reveals the damage caused to Greek antiquities during Germany’s occupation of the country in 1941-1944. The document, by the Directorate of Civil Affairs of the United States War Office was written between November 1944 and March 1945. It was discovered by Graham M. Simons, an English historian and author who has written well over sixty books on aviation history.”

Delaware Online: He’s telling the stories behind Delaware’s World War II dead, one soldier at a time

Delaware Online: He’s telling the stories behind Delaware’s World War II dead, one soldier at a time. “The man who gave him that gift is Lowell Silverman, a Newark resident who has spent the pandemic researching Delaware dead from World War II. A few weeks ago, he created a new website dedicated to the hundreds of Delaware-born soldiers who died with hopes of telling all their stories. He’s off to a fast start.”

KBS World: Digital Archive on Japan’s Wartime Sexual Slavery to be Set up in UCLA

KBS World: Digital Archive on Japan’s Wartime Sexual Slavery to be Set up in UCLA. “A digital archive with translated primary sources and documentary evidence on Japan’s wartime sexual slavery is set to be established at the University of California, Los Angeles(UCLA). Comfort Women Action for Redress and Education(CARE), an advocacy group for the victims of Japan’s wartime sexual slavery, said Tuesday that the online archive will be set up at UCLA’s Center for Korean Studies as early as July. ”

The Mainichi: Kamikaze pilot museum in Japan launches online services for remote visitors

The Mainichi: Kamikaze pilot museum in Japan launches online services for remote visitors . “The online museum consists of 10-minute footage introducing the facility’s layout, plus three 5-minute video clips providing three curators’ commentaries on display items. The clips show photographs of suicide pilots and their farewell notes, laid in order of their departure on the attack missions. The footage also demonstrates the characteristics of the Imperial Japanese Army fighter Hayate, and a replica of the suicide attack boat Shinyo, which are both on display at the museum. Google Maps’ StreetView function also enables a 360-degree view of the facility’s interior.”

Yale News: Songs of survival from Yale’s Fortunoff Archive of Holocaust testimonies

Yale News: Songs of survival from Yale’s Fortunoff Archive of Holocaust testimonies. “‘Shtubuneltsto’ is revived on ‘Cry My Heart, Cry! Songs from Testimonies, Volume 2,’ the latest album of music drawn from the Fortunoff Archive’s collection of more than 4,400 video testimonies. In sharing their stories, the survivors occasionally recalled songs or poetry that touched them before or during the Holocaust. The new album and its 2019 predecessor, ‘Where is Our Homeland?,’ transform these memories into stylistically diverse collections of songs that showcase the rich cultures of the people who created, sang, and enjoyed them.” The music is free to listen to and there will be a virtual concert on April 28.

Kharkiv Human Rights Protection Group: Russia blocks military archives in further effort to distort the truth about World War II

Kharkiv Human Rights Protection Group: Russia blocks military archives in further effort to distort the truth about World War II. “Russia’s Defence Minister, Sergei Shoigu has issued orders which effectively block almost all access to Russian military archives from the period of the Second World War. The move is especially alarming given the current regime’s systematic attempts to push its own narrative about that period, distorting or muffling historical facts, for example, about the Soviet Union’s collaboration with Nazi Germany from 1939 to June 1941.”

Times of Israel: Archives uncover forgotten names of Auschwitz inmates

Times of Israel: Archives uncover forgotten names of Auschwitz inmates. “Ewa Bazan, an archivist at the Auschwitz-Birkenau Museum, compares her work on newly accessible records to piecing together a ‘puzzle’ that is revealing new names and stories of the Nazi death camp’s inmates. Ninety percent of the notorious camp’s files were destroyed by its guards before they fled but a recently completed two-year collaboration with the Arolsen Archives in Germany is bringing new information to light.”