Everyday Heroes: Bountiful resident wants to memorialize every soldier who died during WWII, looking for help (Standard-Examiner)

Standard-Examiner: Everyday Heroes: Bountiful resident wants to memorialize every soldier who died during WWII, looking for help. “[Don] Milne, 59, of Bountiful, recently launched a nonprofit called ‘Stories Behind the Stars,’ an ambitious project that aims to compile short histories of all of the 400,000 plus American soldiers who died during WWII. The histories would be searchable, by name, from an online database Milne is creating. He says he’s also developing a smartphone app that would link to the database and allow people to scan names from war memorials and headstones, then instantly be taken to a particular soldier’s biography. A self-described ‘history buff,’ particularly of WWII, Milne has been blogging and writing military bios for fallen soldiers of the war pretty much every day for that past three years. So far, he’s written about 1,200 profiles, piecing the stories together mainly through sources he’s found online. “

Columbia Missourian: SHSMO concludes digitalizing World War II letter collection

Columbia Missourian: SHSMO concludes digitalizing World War II letter collection. “Staffers and volunteers at the State Historical Society of Missouri finished the almost four-year process this month, according to a SHSMO press release. The selection contains texts written by more than 3,000 people, men and women, from every state of the country. They were transcribed and scanned to the SHSMO website with the goal of making the work of researchers, scholars and visitors easier.”

Rafu Shimpo: Northeastern Illinois University Expands JA Redress Collection with Newly Digitized Videos

Rafu Shimpo: Northeastern Illinois University Expands JA Redress Collection with Newly Digitized Videos. “Northeastern Illinois University’s Ronald Williams Library has added newly digitized video footage of the 1981 Commission on the Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC) hearings to its Japanese American Redress Collection.”

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Bradbury Science Museum launches online archives with Manhattan Project science and history

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Bradbury Science Museum launches online archives with Manhattan Project science and history. “The Bradbury Science Museum premiered its online artifacts collection with images of groundbreaking science and history of the Manhattan Project, which developed the world’s first atomic bombs at Los Alamos Laboratory that helped to end World War II.”

New York Times: How Crowdsourcing Aided a Push to Preserve the Histories of Nazi Victims

New York Times: How Crowdsourcing Aided a Push to Preserve the Histories of Nazi Victims. “While the coronavirus pandemic has painfully upended lives and businesses around the world, the lockdowns it caused are providing a unique boost for one group’s effort to help heal a generations-old wound: Nazi atrocities. As the virus prompted lockdowns across Europe, the director of the Arolsen Archives — the world’s largest devoted to the victims of Nazi persecution — joined millions of others working remotely from home and spending lots more time in front of her computer.”

Europeana Pro: Exploring cultural heritage through oral history

Europeana Pro: Exploring cultural heritage through oral history. “Memories of Occupation in Greece is a project supported by the German Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the Erinnerung, Verantwortung und Zukunft Foundation and Freie Universität Berlin. The project collected and archived audiovisual testimonies on the German occupation of Greece (1941-44). To this end, a total of 93 interviews were conducted in Greece with witnesses of the period, including members of resistance organisations, hidden children, Jewish Shoah survivors, prisoners of concentration camps, witnesses to retaliation, and other individuals who experienced the painful period in various ways. The interviews were digitised and made accessible in a trilingual web portal and are available for research, educational and training purposes.”

Sierra Sun Times: National Park Service Awards More than $3.1 Million in Grants to Preserve and Interpret World War II Japanese American Confinement Sites

Sierra Sun Times: National Park Service Awards More than $3.1 Million in Grants to Preserve and Interpret World War II Japanese American Confinement Sites. “The National Park Service is pleased to announce more than $3.1 million in Japanese American Confinement Sites grants that will fund preservation, restoration and education projects throughout the country. The 22 projects funded will help tell the stories of the more than 120,000 Japanese Americans, two-thirds of whom were U.S. citizens, imprisoned by the U.S. government during World War II following the attack on Pearl Harbor by the nation of Japan in 1941.”

DigitalNC: Air-O-Mech issues now on DigitalNC

DigitalNC: Air-O-Mech issues now on DigitalNC. “The Air-O-Mech is a newspaper published at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base (known at the time as Seymour Johnson Field) during World War II. It is now on DigitalNC thanks to our partner Wayne County Public Library. The paper’s first issue was published on January 8, 1943 and asked readers to submit a name for the paper and have a chance to win $5 if their name was selected.”

Toronto Star: Toronto Public Library and friends remix wartime posters for the pandemic

Toronto Star: Toronto Public Library and friends remix wartime posters for the pandemic. “‘Keep These Hands Off!’ the Second World War poster implores, urging people to buy victory bonds as a mother and baby cower from the gnarled hands of the enemy. ‘Keep These Hands Off!’ the pandemic version of the poster echoes, as the same mother and baby cower, but with masks. ‘Who knows what, or who you touched.’ The Toronto Public Library has more than 100 wartime posters in its digital collection and, last week, they asked people to remix them ‘to speak to the new historic moment we’re in.'”

Jewish News Syndicate: Online database with 26 million documents on Nazi victims, survivors now online

Jewish News Syndicate: Online database with 26 million documents on Nazi victims, survivors now online. “The world’s most comprehensive archive on the victims and survivors of Nazi persecution reached a ‘milestone’ on Tuesday by publishing 26 million documents to its online database, including new information on forced laborers and deported Jews.”

State Archives of North Carolina: World War II Digital Collection Additions

State Archives of North Carolina: World War II Digital Collection Additions. “The Digital Services Section of the State Archives of North Carolina is pleased to announce new additions to the World War II digital collection online. Since Fall 2018, DSS has been digitizing a large addition of items related to World War II from a variety of collections. These items were selected to commemorate the 75th anniversary of World War II and to increase their usage through online access. The items relate to home front activities in North Carolina, North Carolina military installations, and North Carolina soldiers serving in the war.

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Announces Digitization of All 36 Million Available US Draft Cards, Answering More Members’ Questions About Family History (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Announces Digitization of All 36 Million Available US Draft Cards, Answering More Members’ Questions About Family History (PRESS RELEASE). “Today at RootsTech, the largest family history technology conference, Ancestry® announced the release of a game-changing content collection of all 36 million of the nation’s available World War II young man’s draft cards, further empowering customers’ journeys of personal discovery. Available now on Ancestry, the completion of this multi-year project with the US National Archives & Records Administration involved digitizing these valuable records to create a fully searchable collection, including color images.”

Jewish News: Telling the stories of Jews who fought in Bomber Command

Jewish News: Telling the stories of Jews who fought in Bomber Command. “A non-Jewish archivist researching Jews who fought and died in Bomber Command from 1939 to 1945 has set up a self-funded website to share their stories, using Christmas and birthday money to pay for it. Cathie Hewitt left her job last year at the International Bomber Command Centre in Lincoln to focus on the project full-time, creating hundreds of family trees and travelling the world to uncover life stories.”

The Art Newspaper: German court rules in favour of Nazi-looted art database, although owners say a listing makes works unsellable

The Art Newspaper: German court rules in favour of Nazi-looted art database, although owners say a listing makes works unsellable. “A German court has ruled that the current possessor of a work of art cannot stop a claimant from registering it on a government database of Nazi-looted art in the latest in a series of legal challenges to listings on lostart.de, a German website designed to help victims and their heirs recover cultural property lost due to Nazi persecution.”