Japanese Canadian internment: Over 40,000 pages and 180 photographs digitized by the DigiLab (Library and Archives Canada)

Library and Archives Canada Blog: Japanese Canadian internment: Over 40,000 pages and 180 photographs digitized by the DigiLab. “Landscapes of Injustice is a major, seven-year humanities and social justice project led by the University of Victoria, joined to date by fifteen cultural, academic and federal partners, including Library and Archives Canada. The purpose of this project is to research and make known the history of the dispossession—the forced sale of Japanese-Canadian-owned property made legal by Order in Council 1943-0469 (19 January 1943) during the Second World War.”

Newsweek: PBS Gives You a Virtual Experience of Being Japanese American During WWII

Newsweek: PBS Gives You a Virtual Experience of Being Japanese American During WWII. “‘Prisoner in My Homeland’ is the sixth game in the free interactive educational series. The game shows middle and high school students what life was like through the eyes of a Japanese American teenager named Henry Tanaka during World War II. In the game, Tanaka’s family is forced to leave their home on Bainbridge Island, Washington, for a prison camp in Manzanar, California. Players will make decisions based on survival and resistance, and challenge them to think about whether they should help their community, focus on family, support the war effort or resist injustice.”

Deutsche Welle: TikTok Holocaust trend ‘harmful,’ says Auschwitz museum

Deutsche Welle: TikTok Holocaust trend ‘harmful,’ says Auschwitz museum. “The Auschwitz-Birkenau museum and memorial spoke out against a new trend on social media platform TikTok where users role-play as holocaust victims, in a statement released on Wednesday. ‘The “victims” trend on TikTok can be hurtful and offensive,’ said the museum at the site of the former Nazi-German death camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in a statement, adding that some of the videos trivialized history.”

Hankyoreh: S. Korea to release records showing Japan’s mobilization of Korean girls and women into forced labor

Hankyoreh: S. Korea to release records showing Japan’s mobilization of Korean girls and women into forced labor. “On the 75th anniversary of Korea’s liberation by US forces from Japanese the colonial occupation, the National Archives of Korea, the National Library of Korea, and the Northeast Asian History Foundation have released records from the colonial occupation related to the poorly known issue of the labor conscription of women and children. The archives also contained newspaper articles and other documents that were published in support of their conscription.”

New York Times: After Atomic Bombings, These Photographers Worked Under Mushroom Clouds

New York Times: After Atomic Bombings, These Photographers Worked Under Mushroom Clouds. “The idea of publishing in the United States images from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings was first proposed to the University of Texas at Austin in 2017 by the Anti-Nuclear Photographers’ Movement of Japan, one of the organizations that have worked for decades to collect and preserve such photographs. The group was seeking an American publisher because it worried about rising tensions enveloping North Korea, Japan and the United States at the time, and it wanted to broadcast its antinuclear message to a wider audience. Through an intermediary, it approached the Texas university’s Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, whose collection includes photographs of the Vietnam War by the American photojournalist Eddie Adams….The center’s director, Don Carleton, said that while he initially worried that the Japanese group might use the project to ‘assign war guilt,’ it turned out that the two sides had a simple goal in common: educating the public about the horrors of nuclear war. The association eventually agreed to make its photos available as a digital archive at the university, starting in 2021.” Warning: the pictures are horrifying.

KHON: Library launches digital collection for 75th Anniversary of the end of World War II

KHON: Library launches digital collection for 75th Anniversary of the end of World War II. “The Hawaii State Public Library system is launching a new online collection on World War II. The curated collection called Peace, Prosperity and Progress features video, photos and interviews to commemorate and educate folks about the people, time period, culture and events leading up to the end of the war.”

Times of Israel: You can help Nazi victims’ families learn their fates in online archive project

Times of Israel: You can help Nazi victims’ families learn their fates in online archive project. “A huge crowdsourcing project to memorialize the victims of Nazi persecution is bringing together thousands of volunteers from across the globe who are locked down during the international coronavirus crisis. The ‘Every Name Counts’ project, based out of Germany’s Arolsen Archives (formerly the International Tracing Service), aims to make 26 million recently digitized primary historical records searchable.”

Romea .cz: Czech website on the Holocaust launches database of victims labeled “cikáni” by the Nazis and their accomplices

Romea .cz: Czech website on the Holocaust launches database of victims labeled “cikáni” by the Nazis and their accomplices. “The database of Holocaust victims available online in Czech, English and German at holocaust.cz now has a new section containing data about more victims of racial persecution in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia, those who were labeled ‘cikáni’ during the Second World War. The Nazis’ racist persecution of those labeled this way affected most of the Roma and Sinti people during the Second World War who were living on the territory of what is today the Czech Republic.”

Neos Kosmos: Greek survivors voice painful memories of the German occupation

Neos Kosmos: Greek survivors voice painful memories of the German occupation. “When contemporary witnesses speak of their experiences during the WW2 German invasion and occupation of Greece between 1941 and 1944, history comes alive. Before an online video archive of their voices could be made by historians of both countries a lot of persuasion work was needed because the resource was co-funded by the German government.”

Everyday Heroes: Bountiful resident wants to memorialize every soldier who died during WWII, looking for help (Standard-Examiner)

Standard-Examiner: Everyday Heroes: Bountiful resident wants to memorialize every soldier who died during WWII, looking for help. “[Don] Milne, 59, of Bountiful, recently launched a nonprofit called ‘Stories Behind the Stars,’ an ambitious project that aims to compile short histories of all of the 400,000 plus American soldiers who died during WWII. The histories would be searchable, by name, from an online database Milne is creating. He says he’s also developing a smartphone app that would link to the database and allow people to scan names from war memorials and headstones, then instantly be taken to a particular soldier’s biography. A self-described ‘history buff,’ particularly of WWII, Milne has been blogging and writing military bios for fallen soldiers of the war pretty much every day for that past three years. So far, he’s written about 1,200 profiles, piecing the stories together mainly through sources he’s found online. “

Columbia Missourian: SHSMO concludes digitalizing World War II letter collection

Columbia Missourian: SHSMO concludes digitalizing World War II letter collection. “Staffers and volunteers at the State Historical Society of Missouri finished the almost four-year process this month, according to a SHSMO press release. The selection contains texts written by more than 3,000 people, men and women, from every state of the country. They were transcribed and scanned to the SHSMO website with the goal of making the work of researchers, scholars and visitors easier.”

Rafu Shimpo: Northeastern Illinois University Expands JA Redress Collection with Newly Digitized Videos

Rafu Shimpo: Northeastern Illinois University Expands JA Redress Collection with Newly Digitized Videos. “Northeastern Illinois University’s Ronald Williams Library has added newly digitized video footage of the 1981 Commission on the Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC) hearings to its Japanese American Redress Collection.”