Asahi Shimbun: More images of Hiroshima after war found in foreign archives

Asahi Shimbun: More images of Hiroshima after war found in foreign archives. “The Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum here Oct. 10 released a batch of photos previously unknown in Japan of this city’s devastation soon after the 1945 atomic bombing. The 32 images taken during the Allied occupation were discovered in archives in the United States and New Zealand.”

Now Available! The Japanese American Internment Sites: A Digital Archive (Berkeley)

Berkeley: Now Available! The Japanese American Internment Sites: A Digital Archive. “The project builds upon two previous grants conducted between 2011-2017 to digitize 100,000 documents from the Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study and 150,000 original items from Bancroft’s archival collections including the personal papers of internees, correspondence, extensive photograph collections, maps, artworks and audiovisual materials. Together, these collections bring the total number of digitized and publicly available items to about 400,000 and form one of the premier sources of digital documentation on Japanese American Confinement found anywhere.”

Libraries and Archives Canada: How archives can protect human rights

Libraries and Archives Canada: How archives can protect human rights. “When asked to name one of Canada’s fundamental democratic institutions, how many people would immediately say ‘Library and Archives Canada’? Yet, a nation’s archives preserves in perpetuity the evidence of how we are governed. From the story of Japanese Canadian Redress, we can learn how records held by Library and Archives Canada (LAC)—combined with crucial citizen activism making use of these records—have contributed to holding the federal government accountable for now universally condemned actions.”

The Mainichi: Digital archive launched to share stories of A-bomb survivors living across Japan

The Mainichi:Digital archive launched to share stories of A-bomb survivors living across Japan . “A non-profit organization has launched a digital archive of the experiences of atomic-bomb survivors no longer living in Hiroshima and Nagasaki prefectures.”

CNET: Facebook screws up again on the Holocaust, this time with photo of children

CNET: Facebook screws up again on the Holocaust, this time with photo of children. “The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect last week called on its 112,000 followers to sign a petition demanding that Facebook remove pages denying the Holocaust from its site. That didn’t happen. Instead, a week later, Facebook removed a news article that the center posted about Holocaust education ‘for apparently violating community standards,’ the center said. The violation: It included a photo showing naked, emaciated children from a Nazi concentration camp.”

Kyodo News: Digital archives in Japan keep WWII survivors’ memories alive online

Kyodo News: Digital archives in Japan keep WWII survivors’ memories alive online. “With memories of World War II fading 73 years after its end as an increasing number of people have no firsthand experience, efforts have been under way to digitize accounts of survivors to keep their memories alive and pass them on to younger generations. Videos of survivors recounting the damage of air raids, their daily lives during wartime and battlefield experiences, have been released online by the Mitaka city government in suburban Tokyo and Yahoo Japan Corp.”