Utah State University: USU Anthropology Student, Vet Med Faculty Identify Object in Centuries-Old Indigenous Pouch

Utah State University: USU Anthropology Student, Vet Med Faculty Identify Object in Centuries-Old Indigenous Pouch. “Anthropologists sometimes work with animal remains in the course of understanding how human societies lived, but they rarely cross paths with veterinarians, who focus on treating living animals. However, when anthropology graduate student Alexandra Wolberg needed to analyze an unusual Indigenous pouch without damaging it, the College of Veterinary Medicine had a unique opportunity to support one of Utah State University’s anthropologists.”

University of Wisconsin-Madison: 3D scan will reveal the stories hidden within 1,200-year-old Wisconsin canoe

University of Wisconsin-Madison: 3D scan will reveal the stories hidden within 1,200-year-old Wisconsin canoe. “[Lennon] Rodgers — who directs the Grainger Engineering Design and Innovation Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin–Madison — was there to help archaeologists better understand a 1,200-year-old, 15-foot dugout canoe recovered in 2021 from the waters of Lake Mendota, the largest of Madison’s four lakes and part of the ancestral home of the Ho-Chunk Nation. At the invitation of Wisconsin State Archaeologist James Skibo and Scott Roller, senior collections manager for the Wisconsin Historical Society, Rodgers scanned the canoe and created detailed 3D renderings that will preserve the boat’s legacy and allow researchers to study the craft while it undergoes a multiyear preservation process.”

University of Wisconin-Madison: Researchers aim X-rays at century-old plant secretions for insight into Aboriginal Australian cultural heritage

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Researchers aim X-rays at century-old plant secretions for insight into Aboriginal Australian cultural heritage. “…knowing the chemical composition of pigments and binders that Aboriginal Australian artists employ could allow archaeological scientists and art conservators to identify these materials in important cultural heritage objects. Now, researchers are turning to X-ray science to help reveal the composition of the materials used in Aboriginal Australian cultural heritage – starting with the analysis of century-old samples of plant secretions, or exudates.”

EurekAlert: X-rays combined with AI offer fast diagnostic tool in detecting COVID-19

EurekAlert: X-rays combined with AI offer fast diagnostic tool in detecting COVID-19. “X-rays, first used clinically in the late 1890s, could be a leading-edge diagnostic tool for COVID-19 patients with the help of artificial intelligence, according to a team of researchers in Brazil who taught a computer program, through various machine learning methods, to detect COVID-19 in chest X-rays with 95.6 to 98.5% accuracy.”

CNN: Rare ‘locked’ letter sealed 300 years ago is finally opened virtually

CNN: Rare ‘locked’ letter sealed 300 years ago is finally opened virtually. “Three hundred years ago, before envelopes, passwords and security codes, writers often struggled to keep thoughts, cares and dreams expressed in their letters private. One popular way was to use a technique called letter locking — intricately folding a flat sheet of paper to become its own envelope. This security strategy presented a challenge when 577 locked letters delivered to The Hague in the Netherlands between 1689 and 1706 were found in a trunk of undelivered mail.”

Medical Xpress: Using lung X-rays to diagnose COVID-19

Medical Xpress: Using lung X-rays to diagnose COVID-19. “Researchers from the Department of Computer Architecture and Technology at the University of Seville’s School of Computer Engineering (ETSII) are working on a system that uses X-ray images of patients’ lungs to help diagnose COVID-19. This system uses deep learning to train a neural network model that can distinguish between healthy patients, pneumonia patients and COVID-19 patients. This has been achieved using a freely accessible online database that medical professionals from around the world have been feeding with lung X-rays since the onset of the pandemic.”

BBC: The groundbreaking way to search lungs for signs of Covid-19

BBC: The groundbreaking way to search lungs for signs of Covid-19. “When Covid-19 was at its height in China, doctors in the city of Wuhan were able to use artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms to scan the lungs of thousands of patients. The algorithm in question, developed by Axial AI, analyses CT imagery in seconds. It declares, for example, whether a patient has a high risk of viral pneumonia from coronavirus or not.”

Vancouver Sun: Vancouver radiologists and UBC students build database of COVID-19-affected lung images

Vancouver Sun: Vancouver radiologists and UBC students build database of COVID-19-affected lung images. “Most COVID-19 patients experience mild symptoms and recover within a week or two without treatment. But for those with moderate to even fatal cases, there is still a lot unknown about how the virus progresses. Two Vancouver radiologists are working with researchers and students at the University of B.C. to sort thousands of CT scans and chest x-ray images from COVID-19 patients that all show opaque patches on lungs that look like ground-up glass.”

Ohio State University: New Research Finds Chest X-Ray Isn’t Reliable Diagnostic Tool For COVID-19

Ohio State University: New Research Finds Chest X-Ray Isn’t Reliable Diagnostic Tool For COVID-19. “The research team led by Dr. Michael Weinstock, an adjunct professor of emergency medicine at The Ohio State University College of Medicine, reviewed more than 630 chest x-rays of confirmed and symptomatic COVID-19 patients of a large urgent care company in New York and New Jersey. The radiologists determined the chest x-rays were normal in 58.3% of cases, and normal or only mildly abnormal in 89% of patients.”

Dayton Daily News: UD grad licenses UD tech to quickly spot COVID-19 in X-rays

Dayton Daily News: UD grad licenses UD tech to quickly spot COVID-19 in X-rays. “It didn’t take long for the University of Dayton to agree to license a new technology to a software company led by a UD grad for the fight against the coronavirus. Software developed by a University of Dayton Research Institute scientist to speedily diagnose COVID-19 has been exclusively licensed by South Carolina software development company Blue Eye Soft, UDRI said Monday.”

Ars Technica: How AI helps unlock the secrets of Old Master and modernist paintings

Ars Technica: How AI helps unlock the secrets of Old Master and modernist paintings . “X-rays are a well-established tool to help analyze and restore valuable paintings because the rays’ higher frequency means they pass right through paintings without harming them. X-ray imaging can reveal anything that has been painted over a canvas or where the artist may have altered his (or her) original vision. But the technique has its limitations, and that’s where machine learning can prove useful. Two papers this fall illustrated the use of AI to solve specific problems in art analysis and conservation: one to reconstruct an underpainting in greater detail, and the other to make it easier to image two-sided painted panels.”