YaleNews: Project revives old software, preserves ‘born-digital’ data

YaleNews: Project revives old software, preserves ‘born-digital’ data. “Digital preservationists at Yale University Library are building a shareable ’emulation as a service’ infrastructure to resurrect thousands of obsolete software programs and ensure that the information produced on them will be kept intact and made easily available for future access, study, and use.”

New-to-Me, from Yale: Digital Archive of Medieval Song

New-to-me, found via a Google Alert, looks like it’s relatively recent, from Yale: Digital Archive of Medieval Song. “This project will develop a digital platform to publish texts, manuscript images, music, and scholarly resources relating to medieval song in late-medieval England. Approximately 3,000 lyrics in English survive in 450 manuscripts from the twelfth to the early sixteenth century, alongside many more in Latin and French. The large majority are anonymous; some are copied with music. Only a fraction of this important repertory has been studied and performed. This Archive aims to make the close and careful study of these songs in original manuscripts accessible to the scholars and public who are interested in the rich history of song in England.”

Yale University Library: Fortunoff Archive receives Delmas grant to transcribe earliest testimonies

Yale University Library: Fortunoff Archive receives Delmas grant to transcribe earliest testimonies. “The Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies is delighted to announce that it is the recipient of a grant from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation. The Delmas Foundation, which was established to promote ‘the advancement and perpetuation of humanistic inquiry and artistic creativity,’ will help the Archive transcribe the oldest testimonies in its collection, which were recorded between 1979 and 1981 by the Archive’s predecessor organization: the Holocaust Survivors Film Project.”

Yale News: Peabody digitization project facilitates ‘time travel’ to Cretaceous period

Yale News: Peabody digitization project facilitates ‘time travel’ to Cretaceous period. “The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History houses tens of thousands of fossil specimens collected from the chalk deposits the seaway left behind — from one-celled foraminifera to alpha predators. … The museum has partnered with eight natural history institutions nationwide to digitize their fossil collections related to the seaway in order to enable researchers and students to better understand this once-vibrant and long-disappeared ecosystem.”

Yale News: Crowd-sourced project to build Yale theater history database

Yale News: Crowd-sourced project to build Yale theater history database. “Ensemble @ Yale is a crowd-sourced project to create a database of Yale theater history. Modeled on the New York Public Library’s (NYPL) crowd-sourced endeavor to transcribe data from its collections of historical theater programs, the project invites people to browse through digital images of Yale programs and mark and transcribe various data, such as the titles of plays, production dates, the directors, and the names of cast and crew members.”

Yale: Yale team uses Google analytical tool to gauge vaccine effectiveness

From Yale: Yale team uses Google analytical tool to gauge vaccine effectiveness. “Using a statistical method initially developed by Google, a Yale School of Public Health-led research team has devised a novel way to better analyze the impact of vaccines. The research was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Pneumococcus, a bacterial pathogen, is one of the most significant causes of pneumonia around the world. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), pneumonia is the leading cause of death globally in children under the age of 5. Vaccines that prevent pneumococcal infection can decrease pneumonia rates, but quantifying the impact of the vaccine remains challenging.”

Yale Center for British Art Releases 20K+ Images Into Public Domain

The Yale Center for British Art has released over 20,000 images into the public domain. “This new release contains a treasure trove of images of over 1,700 prints after works by J. M. W. Turner, as well as masterpieces by William Blake, Thomas Rowlandson, and others. Under Yale University’s Open Access Policy, anyone may use the Center’s digital images of public domain material without any application, authorization, or fees due to the Center or to Yale.”