YaleNews: Digital humanist Schuwey on rebooting a 400-year-old French Facebook

YaleNews: Digital humanist Schuwey on rebooting a 400-year-old French Facebook. “At Yale, in the newly reopened Digital Humanities Lab (DHLab), [Christophe] Schuwey will work on one of his latest projects, which involves digitizing the printed books of written portraits that circulated amongst French elites and high bourgeoisie in the 1600s — which, he said, functioned pretty much like Facebook does today. Schuwey will use 21st-century computing technology to relink these 17th-century social networks, giving modern scholars like himself new access to this lost ‘virtual world’ of fluctuating social hierarchy and markets of individual reputation in 1600s France.”

Yale News: Online search tool ‘lifting a veil’ on Yale’s collections

Yale News: Online search tool ‘lifting a veil’ on Yale’s collections. “Archives at Yale, a new software tool launched in early September, allows students, faculty, and other researchers to search more precisely across and within more than 5,000 collections held by 10 Yale libraries and museums. The new tool is based on a widely used open-source web application — which means that Yale’s investment in developing it will benefit other libraries and museums around the world. “

Yale University Library: Grammy Museum-funded digitization project brings rare Charles Ives performances to the world

Yale University Library: Grammy Museum-funded digitization project brings rare Charles Ives performances to the world. “The Irving S. Gilmore Music Library has completed an eighteen-month project to digitize and stream online a collection of early, rarely heard performances of works composed by Charles Ives.”

YaleNews: Project revives old software, preserves ‘born-digital’ data

YaleNews: Project revives old software, preserves ‘born-digital’ data. “Digital preservationists at Yale University Library are building a shareable ’emulation as a service’ infrastructure to resurrect thousands of obsolete software programs and ensure that the information produced on them will be kept intact and made easily available for future access, study, and use.”

New-to-Me, from Yale: Digital Archive of Medieval Song

New-to-me, found via a Google Alert, looks like it’s relatively recent, from Yale: Digital Archive of Medieval Song. “This project will develop a digital platform to publish texts, manuscript images, music, and scholarly resources relating to medieval song in late-medieval England. Approximately 3,000 lyrics in English survive in 450 manuscripts from the twelfth to the early sixteenth century, alongside many more in Latin and French. The large majority are anonymous; some are copied with music. Only a fraction of this important repertory has been studied and performed. This Archive aims to make the close and careful study of these songs in original manuscripts accessible to the scholars and public who are interested in the rich history of song in England.”

Yale University Library: Fortunoff Archive receives Delmas grant to transcribe earliest testimonies

Yale University Library: Fortunoff Archive receives Delmas grant to transcribe earliest testimonies. “The Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies is delighted to announce that it is the recipient of a grant from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation. The Delmas Foundation, which was established to promote ‘the advancement and perpetuation of humanistic inquiry and artistic creativity,’ will help the Archive transcribe the oldest testimonies in its collection, which were recorded between 1979 and 1981 by the Archive’s predecessor organization: the Holocaust Survivors Film Project.”

Yale News: Peabody digitization project facilitates ‘time travel’ to Cretaceous period

Yale News: Peabody digitization project facilitates ‘time travel’ to Cretaceous period. “The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History houses tens of thousands of fossil specimens collected from the chalk deposits the seaway left behind — from one-celled foraminifera to alpha predators. … The museum has partnered with eight natural history institutions nationwide to digitize their fossil collections related to the seaway in order to enable researchers and students to better understand this once-vibrant and long-disappeared ecosystem.”