Ubergizmo: Selfies Are Apparently Driving Cosmetic Surgery Requests

Ubergizmo: Selfies Are Apparently Driving Cosmetic Surgery Requests. “Thanks to apps like Snapchat and Instagram introducing various filters that we can apply during our selfies to make ourselves look silly, look beautiful, and so on, it seems to have created a side-effect which is that it is apparently driving requests from teens for cosmetic surgery that will make them look as good as their selfies.”

University of Southern California: Grandparents’ move to Facebook spurs both embarrassing ‘fails’ and opportunities

University of Southern California: Grandparents’ move to Facebook spurs both embarrassing ‘fails’ and opportunities. “Older Americans are the fastest-growing group to use Facebook, according to a Gallup poll released in April. More than half of those between ages 50 and 64 now have a Facebook page; in 2011, only about a third did. And about a third of people age 65 and older now use Facebook as well. As recently as three years ago, 71 percent of teens reported that they used Facebook, according to another study from the Pew Research Center, and that figure has now dropped to 51 percent. While the shifting user base and other factors have skewed Facebook older, many younger users still keep their Facebook pages. Recent data show that Facebook is more popular among lower-income youth. And sources such as Gallup indicate that numbers of college-age Facebook users are holding steady.”

The Atlantic: Teens Are Debating the News on Instagram

The Atlantic: Teens Are Debating the News on Instagram. “It’s harder and harder to have an honest debate on the internet. Social-media platforms like Twitter, Reddit, and Facebook Groups are rife with trolls; forums are plagued by archaic layouts and spambots. Teenagers who are looking to talk about big issues face additional frustrations, like the fact that most adults on these platforms don’t take them seriously. Naturally, they’ve turned to Instagram. Specifically, they’ve turned to ‘flop’ accounts—pages that are collectively managed by several teens, many of them devoted to discussions of hot-button topics: gun control, abortion, immigration, President Donald Trump, LGBTQ issues, YouTubers, breaking news, viral memes.”

TechCrunch: Researchers find that filters don’t prevent porn

TechCrunch: Researchers find that filters don’t prevent porn . “In a paper entitled Internet Filtering and Adolescent Exposure to Online Sexual Material, Oxford Internet Institute researchers Victoria Nash and Andrew Przybylski found that Internet filters rarely work to keep adolescents away from online porn.”

The Verge: Young People Still Love Twitter — As Screenshots On Instagram

The Verge: Young People Still Love Twitter — As Screenshots On Instagram. “As social media platforms grow more popular, younger audiences tend to flee in search of newer alternatives. This generation is no different. Pew Research Center recently reported that fewer teenagers than ever are using platforms like Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr. But that doesn’t mean that younger users are finished with the content from those sites altogether. Instead, Instagram — still hugely popular as a place to post glossy, aspirational images of your vacation, your coffee, or gratuitous selfies — has grown into a home away from home to consume screenshots of the best content from those services.”

Reuters: Good social media experiences don’t outweigh bad ones for young adults

Reuters: Good social media experiences don’t outweigh bad ones for young adults. “For young adults, the adverse effect of negative social media experiences on mental health outweigh any potential benefits of positive experiences, a study of university students suggests. Each 10 percent increase in a student’s negative experiences on social media was associated with a 20 percent increase in the odds of depressive symptoms, researchers found.”

Yellin Center: Pediatrician Screening for Social Media Use Urged

Yellin Center: Pediatrician Screening for Social Media Use Urged. “In the latest issue of the journal Pediatrics, a team from the Baylor School of Medicine has proposed expanding the guidelines for adolescent health screenings to include questions about social media use. The proposal is based on data that finds teen social use resembles the patterns of substance addiction, with usage increasing over time from an average of 16 minutes a day between ages 10 and 12 to an average of 71 minutes a day during adolescence. Teenage girls report the highest usage, some 142 minutes per day on average. Anxiety during periods of withdrawal increase with age and usage, with 80 percent of college students indicating that they feel anxious when they are not able to access their devices, the authors report.”