When Twitter Fingers Turn to Trigger Fingers: a Qualitative Study of Social Media-Related Gang Violence (Berkman Klein Center)

Berkman Klein Center: When Twitter Fingers Turn to Trigger Fingers: a Qualitative Study of Social Media-Related Gang Violence. “A study by BKC Faculty Associate Desmond Patton, et al. addresses the challenges many researchers and practitioners face when trying to understand relationships between social media use and gang activity in marginalized communities. It outlines the methods, guidelines, and results to their study to better address this barrier.” This article links to the research article which I was able to completely access.

‘Am I depressed?’: How teens can find mental health help online (Mashable)

Mashable: ‘Am I depressed?’: How teens can find mental health help online. “…many young people grappling with psychological distress or mental illness are hesitant to tell someone who could help them. Instead, they may look for answers online, where Google searches can lead them to both information about effective treatment and therapy and to misleading or bad advice. Teens looking for hope amidst a sea of online resources can arm themselves with the following tips.”

Forbes: New $25 Million Initiative Aims To Provide Young Women With Contemporary STEM Role Models

Forbes: New $25 Million Initiative Aims To Provide Young Women With Contemporary STEM Role Models. “IF/THEN aims to inspire young women to enter the STEM fields by highlighting the achievements of modern female role models in STEM. It will do so by introducing female role models into mainstream culture by illuminating their achievements through media by posting content on YouTube, on cable television shows such as Bravo’s Project Runway, as well as introducing weekly television series which will showcase how STEM works behind the scenes and how it many of our day-to-day processes are made possible by advances in the STEM disciplines.”

Mashable: Facebook lied about how many teens it used for research

Mashable: Facebook lied about how many teens it used for research. “In January, an investigation from TechCrunch found that Facebook was paying people, including teenagers, $20 to monitor their internet and phone use. At the time, Facebook said that less than 5 percent of its study participants were teens, and that participants under 18 were required to get parental consent. But now, Facebook has revealed that teens comprised 18 percent of its users — not five.”

‘Since Parkland’: A remarkable project by teen journalists about kids killed by guns in America (Washington Post)

Washington Post: ‘Since Parkland’: A remarkable project by teen journalists about kids killed by guns in America. “…as the project’s new website explains, more than 200 teen journalists across the country last summer began researching and writing the life stories of young Americans — from newborns to 18-year-olds — who were killed during a year in this country. Their stories start on Feb. 14, 2018, the day a gunman walked into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., and killed 17 people, 14 of them students. Those young people were not the only ones to die in America from guns that day.”

Mashable: Facebook ends its teen meme hub, LOL, amid a reshuffle of its youth team

Mashable: Facebook ends its teen meme hub, LOL, amid a reshuffle of its youth team. “In January, Facebook was reportedly working on something named LOL, a bid to win over younger users with “a special feed of funny videos and GIF-like clips,” which sat within the main Facebook app. The experimentation, which was done with a small number of users, didn’t last very long: Recode reports the LOL project is dead before it even launched.” This has a very “how do you do, fellow kids” feeling to it.

Refinery29: Self-Harm & Suicide Content Is Still Alarmingly Easy To Find on Social Media

Refinery 29: Self-Harm & Suicide Content Is Still Alarmingly Easy To Find on Social Media. “While other harmful topics appear to have been blocked completely on Instagram, searching for ‘self harm’ still brings up handles which contain the words. Some accounts are private, others are not. Within a minute of browsing through these accounts, you can find alternative self-harm hashtags in image captions that are currently in use, which are often amalgams of similar words and phrases.”