Florida teen fighting for her life against COVID-19; family begs people to wear masks (Herald-Tribune)

Herald-Tribune: Florida teen fighting for her life against COVID-19; family begs people to wear masks. “Just two weeks ago, 16-year-old Halene O’Connell was a normal, healthy teenage girl, ready to start the summer before her senior year at Milton High School. But today, she’s in a coma and on a ventilator fighting for her life at the Studer Family Children’s Hospital at Ascension Sacred Heart in Pensacola, battling a severe case of COVID-19 — and her family is begging the community to wear masks and practice social distancing so they don’t end up in a hospital bed too.”

Route Fifty: Know a Teen who Needs a Summer Job? Covid-19 Response is Hiring.

Route Fifty: Know a Teen who Needs a Summer Job? Covid-19 Response is Hiring.. “State and local officials are attracting new recruits in the fight against Covid-19: teenagers and young adults. A handful of counties, cities and states across the country have announced plans to expand or revamp existing youth employment programs to include opportunities to assist in government-led coronavirus response initiatives.”

Public Technology: Government turns to Instagram to seek policy guidance from teenagers

Public Technology (UK): Government turns to Instagram to seek policy guidance from teenagers. “The government has unveiled a new Instagram page through which it wishes to garner policy guidance from teenagers and young adults. The ‘Involved’ account will use the photo-sharing site’s polling and stories functions to ask questions related to ‘decisions made at the heart of government’. The government wishes to hear the responses of young people aged between 13 and 25.”

Washington Post: Young people urged to take virus more seriously as pandemic worsens in U.S.

Washington Post: Young people urged to take virus more seriously as pandemic worsens in U.S.. “While the virus is most dangerous to the elderly, it can be devastating to younger victims as well, health professionals said. Younger coronavirus patients are a widening percentage of total coronavirus hospitalizations, with those in the 18 to 49 age group growing from about 27 percent of hospitalizations the week ending March 7 to 35 percent this past week, CDC figures show.”

CNN: More young people across the South are testing positive for coronavirus, officials warn

CNN: More young people across the South are testing positive for coronavirus, officials warn. “Officials in states across the South are warning that more young people are testing positive for coronavirus. The shifts in demographics have been recorded in parts of Florida, South Carolina, Georgia, Texas and other states — many of which were some of the first to reopen. And while some officials have pointed to more widespread testing being done, others say the new cases stem from Americans failing to social distance.”

TikTok: Fears videos may ‘trigger eating disorders’ (BBC)

BBC: TikTok: Fears videos may ‘trigger eating disorders’. “Social media app TikTok could encourage unhealthy relationships with food and trigger people who have suffered eating disorders, campaigners have said. The video app is one of the most popular in the world, with more than 800m users – 41% of those users between the age of 16 and 24. But there are fears some of the content glamorises eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia.”

The rise of the ‘quaranteenager’: How to help young adults with their mental health during the pandemic (The National)

The National: The rise of the ‘quaranteenager’: How to help young adults with their mental health during the pandemic. “The number of people living with mental health disorders amid the coronavirus crisis has undoubtedly soared, but teenagers are particularly at risk, says one UAE psychologist. Tanya Dharamshi, clinical director and counselling psychologist at Dubai’s Priory Wellbeing Centre, says the clinic has seen an upsurge in teenagers visiting, as they have been diagnosed with issues such as anxiety, depression and obsessive compulsive disorder since schooling went virtual.”

TIME: How COVID-19 Will Shape the Class of 2020 For the Rest of Their Lives

TIME: How COVID-19 Will Shape the Class of 2020 For the Rest of Their Lives. “College graduation is often marked by an adjustment period, as students leave the comforts of campus to find their way in the raw wilderness of the job market. But this year’s graduates are staggering into a world that is in some ways unrecognizable. More than 90,000 Americans have died; tens of millions are out of work; entire industries have crumbled. The virus and the economic shock waves it unleashed have hammered Americans of all ages. But graduating in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic will have enduring implications on the Class of 2020: for their memories, their earning power, and their view of what it means to have a functional society. For these young adults, the pandemic represents not just a national crisis but also a defining moment.”

Los Angeles Times: Teens are feeling lonely and anxious in isolation. Here’s how parents can help

Los Angeles Times: Teens are feeling lonely and anxious in isolation. Here’s how parents can help. “Normally adolescence, a developmental period marked by impulsivity and feelings of invincibility, is a time in which teenagers separate from their parents and bond with their peers. Now that families are confined at home, parents are in a peculiar position in which they have to balance the seriousness of the novel coronavirus with their teen’s desire for social interaction.”

WBEZ: COVID Toes Skin Disease Gains A Foothold Across The Country

WBEZ: COVID Toes Skin Disease Gains A Foothold Across The Country. “In the Chicago area, teens and young adults are developing red, purple, sore and itchy toes that doctors are informally calling ‘COVID toes.’ Dr. Amy Paller, the chair of dermatology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, said that in the past week she’s gotten more than 50 reports of new pediatric cases in the Chicago area. She said she expects many more cases as news of the condition spreads.”

Washington Post: Young and middle-aged people, barely sick with covid-19, are dying from strokes

Washington Post: Young and middle-aged people, barely sick with covid-19, are dying from strokes. “Thomas Oxley wasn’t even on call the day he received the page to come to Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital in Manhattan. There weren’t enough doctors to treat all the emergency stroke patients, and he was needed in the operating room. The patient’s chart appeared unremarkable at first glance. He took no medications and had no history of chronic conditions. He had been feeling fine, hanging out at home during the lockdown like the rest of the country, when suddenly, he had trouble talking and moving the right side of his body. Imaging showed a large blockage on the left side of his head. Oxley gasped when he got to the patient’s age and covid-19 status: 44, positive.”

New York Times: Where Westchester Teens Get Their Coronavirus News

New York Times: Where Westchester Teens Get Their Coronavirus News. “‘Westchester memes is how people know what’s going on,’ Quinn Muller said. She’s 14 and lives in Sleepy Hollow, in Westchester County. She, and many of her peers in towns just north of New York City, are using local meme pages as their news source for updates about the new coronavirus.”

The Conversation: Children’s use of social media is creating a new type of digital native

The Conversation: Children’s use of social media is creating a new type of digital native. “The first generation of people who have grown up using social media such as Facebook and Instagram are entering the workforce. For as long as this breed of so-called ‘digital natives’ has been alive, some academics have been arguing that using the internet from a young age would shape the way people learn, work and even think. But it is still not clear how useful this kind of generational divide actually is, or how different these young people are to ‘digital immigrants’ born in a pre-internet age. Some studies suggest what matters is not age but the level of experience and knowledge people have with a particular technology.”

Google Blog: Reaching a new generation of news viewers with VidSpark

Google Blog: Reaching a new generation of news viewers with VidSpark. “People in their teens and twenties are looking for content that’s important, but also engaging, fun, and relatable. We don’t need to seek out information; thanks to a variety of social feeds and specialized algorithms, it comes to us. But it doesn’t always come from trustworthy sources. Meanwhile, mainstream local news is struggling to meet young audiences where they are. If they rely only on their traditional methods of distribution, they risk becoming irrelevant to the next generation. With the support of the Google News Initiative, Poynter is announcing VidSpark—a program helping local newsrooms reach younger viewers online with engaging, shareable social video.”