Tubefilter: Creators Can’t Always Take Risks With Their Content. That’s Why YouTuber Community Standard Built Nebula — A Platform For Its Creators To Experiment.

Tubefilter: Creators Can’t Always Take Risks With Their Content. That’s Why YouTuber Community Standard Built Nebula — A Platform For Its Creators To Experiment.. “Standard isn’t a multichannel network, or a creative agency, or a management company. It’s something different. Wiskus, along with co-founders Philipp Dettmer (aka Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell on YouTube with 8.9 million subscribers) and CGP Grey (3.8 million), started Standard as a self-described ‘toolbox’ for ‘thoughtful content’ creators that supplies its members with production resources, design guidance, career mentorship, sponsorship opportunities, and data like channel engagement analytics.” … and a place where they don’t have to worry about getting flash-fried by YouTube’s algorithms.

EurekAlert: The hidden secrets of creating a viral YouTube ad

EurekAlert: The hidden secrets of creating a viral YouTube ad. “The research team tested five hypotheses about what drives sharing of video ads across social media, using two independent field studies that analyzed 11 measures of emotion and over 60 ad characteristics. The study included 109 brands that were among the top 100 US advertisers in 2012 as well as additional brands that were historically active on YouTube.”

CNET: Meet the angry gaming YouTubers who turn outrage into views

CNET: Meet the angry gaming YouTubers who turn outrage into views. “Starting last year, a new cadre of negative YouTube gaming commentators came to prominence. Almost in unison, they each enjoyed spikes in audience and view counts, attracting hundreds of thousands of subscribers. That translated into millions of views a week as they dissected the video game industry’s missteps, misadventures and controversies. The views get rewarded by YouTube in ad dollars.”

The Atlantic: The Real Difference Between Creators and Influencers

The Atlantic: The Real Difference Between Creators and Influencers. “Why YouTube’s power users are called creators has been the subject of debate for many years. When asked for comment, a YouTube spokesperson couldn’t even tell me the origin of the term. Some say the name evolved from ‘content creators’ such as bloggers. A recent Wired article postured that men are more likely to self-identify as creators, while women more often call themselves influencers. This is not true. But there’s a reason why the term creator continues to be pervasive, and it’s the same reason that may ultimately lead to the title’s demise.”

IndieWire: The Korean Film Archive Is Now Streaming Over 200 Movies for Free on YouTube

IndieWire: The Korean Film Archive Is Now Streaming Over 200 Movies for Free on YouTube. “After making history at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival by becoming the first South Korean director to win the Palme d’Or, ‘Parasite’ director Bong Joon-ho encouraged cinephiles around the world to seek out more works of South Korean cinema. Thanks to the Korean Film Archive’s official YouTube page, Bong’s wish could not be easier for American moviegoers to fulfill. The KFA is streaming over 200 feature films for free right now on YouTube, many of which have been uploaded to the platform in restored versions.”

Engadget: The best streaming apps for kids

Engadget: The best streaming apps for kids. “Whether it’s conspiracy videos or obviously disturbing clips, YouTube Kids is flooded with terrible content. But that’s not surprising. With 10 hours of video uploaded every second, trying to police YouTube content is like trying to slow the water coming out of a fire hydrant. A spokesperson said last year, ‘We’ve taken a series of tough actions to better protect families on YouTube and YouTube Kids, including getting content down faster through technology, hiring more people to help us tackle content that breaks our rules and cutting the revenue streams to content that misleads families.’ But those actions haven’t always been enough.”

New York Times: Filling Oreo With Toothpaste Earns YouTube Prankster a Jail Sentence

New York Times: Filling Oreo With Toothpaste Earns YouTube Prankster a Jail Sentence. “It was a humiliating video that fueled outrage on social media. A YouTube prankster filmed himself offering a homeless man in Barcelona an Oreo cookie filled with toothpaste rather than cream. Now, the prankster, known as ReSet to his followers on YouTube but whose real name is Kanghua Ren, has been handed a 15-month prison sentence and must pay 20,000 euros, or about $22,300, compensation to his victim.”