downthetubes: British comic fanzines archive “The Fanscene Project” has a new online home

downthetubes: British comic fanzines archive “The Fanscene Project” has a new online home. “Founded back in 2015 as the Classic UK Comic Zines site, artist and comic archivist David Hathaway-Price has been constantly adding to what is now The Fanscene Project… the project is an online, read-only archive of British comic fanzines, published across the last 50 years, including, with the permission of their original editors, titles such as BEM, Comic Media News, Fantasy Trader, Infinity, Speakeasy, and many more.”

‘A collection of odds and ends’: Windsor library publishes first zine (CBC)

CBC: ‘A collection of odds and ends’: Windsor library publishes first zine. “Poems, short stories, even collages: the Windsor Public Library’s (WPL) first-ever zine is giving some Windsor residents the opportunity to see their work in print for the first time. The zine — essentially a small-circulation, self-published literary magazine — is titled Pagination, and includes work from about 30 people. Most of them are from Windsor, but other submissions came from as far as Vancouver, Mexico, and the United Kingdom, said library employee David Konstantino.”

Pitchfork: Every Issue of Punk Planet Is Available on the Internet Archive

Pitchfork: Every Issue of Punk Planet Is Available on the Internet Archive. “You can now read all 80 issues of Punk Planet for free on the Internet Archive. Founded by writer and editor Dan Sinker, the Chicago music and politics zine ran as a print publication from 1994 until 2007. In addition to music features and reviews, Punk Planet covered topics like feminism, politics, human rights, and labor. Issues included interviews with Sleater-Kinney, Nick Cave, Ralph Nader, and countless other cultural icons.”

New York Times: Swipe-Through Activist Guides Are the New Zines

New York Times: Swipe-Through Activist Guides Are the New Zines. “The Yellow Pages stopped printing. Libraries are largely closed. And fliers, well designed as they may be, don’t always meet people where they are. So in this time of grief, isolation and information overload, some are taking a creative approach to resource sharing. Artists, activists and academics are publishing mini-guides on Instagram — swipe-through galleries of text and visuals that help people find local businesses to support and fund community fridges; learn about mutual aid efforts in their neighborhood and the global effects of climate change; locate Black healers and wellness spaces; and nourish themselves, among other things.”

c-X1: The ‘Necromancer’ For All Performers and Portrayers Fanzine Archive

c-X1: The ‘Necromancer’ For All Performers and Portrayers Fanzine Archive. This was a fanzine for the band Rush. “‘The Necromancer’ launched its first four issues across four consecutive months – from July through October of 1988. It then published its next five issues on a bi-monthly basis, ending with its final ninth issue on July/August 1989. Though the fanzine came to an end over thirty years ago, it has now found new life here at Cygnus-X1.net. A complete archive of each issue is now available for your reading and reminiscing pleasure.”

NPR: How To Make A Mini-Zine About Life During The Pandemic

NPR: How To Make A Mini-Zine About Life During The Pandemic. “Check the hashtag #quaranzine on social media and you’ll see thousands of mini books — called zines — that people are making to document their lives in the pandemic. Read the comic to find out how you can make one yourself — including how to fold your zine and what to write about. All you’ll need is a sheet of paper, a pen, 30 minutes and a little creativity.”

Zine Scene: Buffalo State Music Publications Preserved in New Digital Archive (Buffalo State College)

Buffalo State College: Zine Scene: Buffalo State Music Publications Preserved in New Digital Archive. “Long before music websites, blogs, and social media accounts provided a means of instant communication, fanzines—or zines—were one of the few ways for aspiring rock writers to get published. In the early to mid-1970s, Buffalo State College provided a supportive environment for students who embraced a do-it-yourself ethic to detail the burgeoning new music—punk, glam, and new wave—that was largely ignored by the mainstream press. With funding from United Students Government, two influential zines—the Shakin’ Street Gazette (SSG) and Foxtrot—were published and distributed throughout the city.”

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: The largest independent LGBTQ zine collection is stored in a Riverwest basement, and you can see some of it online

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: The largest independent LGBTQ zine collection is stored in a Riverwest basement, and you can see some of it online. “In the garden level of a Riverwest house, there’s a collection of about 2500 zines — the kind of stuff you might not want to read with your mom. It’s called QZAP, and it’s an archive of queer-punk self-published zines.”

University of Iowa: Fanzines of science fiction, fantasy and horror available to read and transcribe

University of Iowa: Fanzines of science fiction, fantasy and horror available to read and transcribe. “What would you do with thousands of fragile leaflets, known as fanzines, that chronicle the history of science fiction? Such fanzines hold rich information too valuable to sit untouched, yet the materials cannot be handled without risking destruction. At the University of Iowa Libraries, a digitization project is underway to save a large, notable zine collection.”

New York City Punk Magazine DRY Digitized, Put Online

The full run of New York City punk magazine Dry has been digitized and put online. It ran for 14 issues, from 1979-1982. “I wouldn’t call Dry a definitive chronicle of NYC punk between 1979 and 1982 by any stretch, but these issues are still a priceless addition to the historical record and certainly worth a gander by anyone with an interest in this specific era of alternative music, particularly things that happened in New York.”

Money Raised to Digitize the Hevelin Collection

Science fiction fans raised almost $2000 to help digitize the Hevelin collection at the University of Iowa archives. “Rusty Hevelin was a science fiction fan, pulp collector, fanzine creator, huckster (a dealer at conventions), and voracious reader for most of his 89 years. He was also involved with the Iowa Science Fiction conventions ICON and Demicon from the time of their founding. After his death in 2011, his collections came to the University of Iowa Special Collections where a recent unprecedented initiative to digitize around 10,000 of the earliest fanzines from roughly 1930s-1950s has begun.”