Phys .org: Citizen scientists help geologists to identify earthquakes and tectonic tremors

Phys .org: Citizen scientists help geologists to identify earthquakes and tectonic tremors. “Tens of thousands of seismic stations around the world continuously record local seismic activity, with an output that is far beyond what scientists can process. Here, researchers from Northwestern University have called over 2,000 citizen scientists to the rescue for the crowd-based analysis of seismic recordings, rendered into audiovisual format, through the program Earthquake Detective on the Open-Science platform Zooniverse. They show that citizens are at least as accurate as machine learning, and can even identify tectonic tremors, which previously was only possible for trained professionals.”

Space: NASA needs your help teaching its Curiosity rover how to drive on Mars

Space: NASA needs your help teaching its Curiosity rover how to drive on Mars. “NASA is asking for your help to guide its Curiosity rover around sand traps, sharp rocks and other obstacles on the Red Planet. A new online tool called AI4Mars, hosted on Zooniverse, allows anyone to label parts of the terrain in the landscape surrounding Curiosity, which has been roving on Mars since 2012.”

Nunatsiaq News: Volunteers sought to help build online database of Arctic botany

Nunatsiaq News: Volunteers sought to help build online database of Arctic botany. “Do you have some time on your hands, a computer and internet connection, and a desire to help improve the world’s understanding of Arctic plants? If so, Jennifer Doubt wants to enlist you as a citizen scientist. Doubt, the Canadian Museum of Nature’s curator of botany, is seeking help to tackle a monumental task. The museum’s botanical collection, known as the National Herbarium, contains more than one million plant specimens, including the world’s best collection of samples from the Canadian Arctic.”

Library of Congress: New Collaboration between LC Labs, British Library, and the Zooniverse

Library of Congress: New Collaboration between LC Labs, British Library, and the Zooniverse. “The project is titled ‘From crowdsourcing to digitally-enabled participation: the state of the art in collaboration, access, and inclusion for cultural heritage institutions,’ resulting from this call. The project will convene experts in several ways over the next 12 months. Together, these groups will describe and document practical approaches and future paths in crowdsourcing through a book sprint, and open comment period, and a follow up workshop.”

Our partnership for 2019: Operation Weather Rescue (British Science Week)

British Science Week: Our partnership for 2019: Operation Weather Rescue. “This year, our Zooniverse citizen science partnership is with Operation Weather Rescue. They’re a team of researchers who are working tirelessly to digitize old weather records. Their project utilises the tried and tested method of people power; drawing on invaluable help from members of the public by asking them to enter pieces of historical weather information into their database. For British Science Week, we have identified two decades of important historical weather data that has never been digitised – and we need your help to rectify this.”

Museum calls for key-use: Will make mega-collection digital (TV 2 Lorry)

I am translating both the headline and the pull quote from Danish using Google Translate. Apologies for any errors. TV 2 Lorry: Museum calls for key-use: Will make mega-collection digital. “Currently, approximately 4,000 butterflies have been photographed and digitized. But all the small print on the tiny handwritten labels, with information about the butterfly, must also be entered. The mini labels, which are not larger than a nail, are placed on the needle under each butterfly in the collection.” The project is being administered by Zooniverse. I went to the project side and did one butterfly with minimal difficulty (I had a little trouble reading a handwritten label in Danish.) Mostly the project is asking you if labels are there, what the dates are, etc.

Penn Today: Reclaiming a Fragmented History

Penn Today: Reclaiming a fragmented history . “Harnessing the power of human cooperation, digital humanities scholars at Penn Libraries are orchestrating an epic effort to sort and transcribe handwriting on thousands of documents discarded hundreds of years ago. Through an innovative new website built by the Penn team in collaboration with Zooniverse, an online platform for crowdsourced research, citizen scholars can help analyze the digitized texts, which are written in five Hebrew and three Arabic scripts, some of them exceedingly rare.”

Phys.org: Using AI, citizen science and disaster response to help victims of Hurricane Irma

Phys.org: Using AI, citizen science and disaster response to help victims of Hurricane Irma. “A highly unusual collaboration between information engineers at Oxford, the Zooniverse citizen science platform and international disaster response organization Rescue Global is enabling a rapid and effective response to Hurricane Irma. The project draws on the power of the Zooniverse, the world’s largest and most popular people-powered research platform, to work with volunteers and crowd source the data needed to understand Irma’s path of destruction and the damage caused. Combining these insights with detailed artificial intelligence will support rescue relief organisations to understand the scale of the crisis, and deliver aid to those worst affected as soon as possible.”

Smithsonian: Citizen Scientists Will Bring Zombie Astrophotos Back to Life With “Astronomy Rewind”

Thanks to Matt S. for bringing this to my attention, from the Smithsonian: Citizen Scientists Will Bring Zombie Astrophotos Back to Life With “Astronomy Rewind”. “A new citizen-science project will rescue tens of thousands of potentially valuable cosmic images that are mostly dead to science and bring them fully back to life. Called “Astronomy Rewind,” the effort, which launched March 22, will take photographs, radio maps, and other telescopic images that have been scanned from the pages of dusty old journals and place them in context in digital sky atlases and catalogs. Anyone will then be able to find them online and compare them with modern electronic data from ground- and space-based telescopes, making possible new studies of short- and long-term changes in the heavens.”

A New Zooniverse Project Wants You to Help Spot Meteors

Zooniverse has launched a new project: Radio Meteor Zoo. From the Web site: “With this Radio Meteor Zoo project we focus on meteor showers, which are mainly due to dust particles released on its orbit by a comet when it approaches the Sun. The Perseids around August 12 are a well-known example of a meteor shower. During a meteor shower, many radio meteor echoes display complex shapes in BRAMS data and automatic detection algorithms struggle to detect them correctly. This is where the Radio Meteor Zoo volunteers come in. You can help us a lot by identifying meteor echoes during meteor showers.”

New Zooniverse Crowdsourcing Project Wants YOU – To Look at Cat Pictures

We know what’s up: the Internet is not a “series of tubes,” it’s a collection of cat pictures. And Zooniverse needs some help identifying those pictures in a new crowdsourcing project. “A critical part of protecting big cats and their landscapes is documenting the presence and behavior of wild cats using camera-traps. Every year, Panthera’s motion-activated cameras collect hundreds of thousands of wildlife images. With your help, we can analyze these photos to identify the animals shown, enabling us to track wild cat population trends over time and determine what conservation actions are needed to better protect these species.”

Felicia Browne Archive Added to AnnoTate

A Felicia Browne archive has been added to AnnoTate. “Discover the archive of Felicia Browne, a London-born artist who was the first British female combatant to lose her life in the Spanish Civil War. As we mark the 80th anniversary of the conflict’s outbreak, delve into Browne’s letters in which she articulates her political views, her stance against fascism, her journey from London to Barcelona and her experiences in Franco’s Spain.”

Notes from Nature Getting a Reboot at Zooniverse

Zooniverse is relaunching Notes from Nature. From the e-mailed announcement: “The previous version of Notes From Nature was a huge success, but we have always known we wanted to make some significant improvements. Over 1.3 million transcriptions were completed by over 9,200 volunteers from around the world. We are truly humbled by the response to the first launch of the project in 2013. We send out a huge thank you to all of the volunteers who made this happen, and welcome you back to take part in the new and improved project.”